The Walkie Check- A holistic talk with creatives

Meet the ghouls: Layne Marie Williams & Kat Gorospe Ep. 1

February 25, 2021 Layne Marie Williams & Kat Gorospe Season 1 Episode 1
The Walkie Check- A holistic talk with creatives
Meet the ghouls: Layne Marie Williams & Kat Gorospe Ep. 1
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In this episode we will introduce ourselves to you. We will discuss everything from staying creative during a pandemic to how we got into the industry.

Boss Babe Inc.
Regina Hoyles
Adullam



Hosts: Layne Marie Williams & Kat Gorospe
Show Sponsor: Quasar Science
Quasar Science exploded onto the scene in 2013 as the world’s 1st Motion Picture compatible LED light bulb company and quickly impacted the lighting industry with its unique form factors, marvelous color spectrum and remarkable customer support. Founded in Hollywood California by a small group of Studio Electrical Lighting Technicians with over 100 years combined experience, the Quasar team understands the high demands of professional lighting on set and on stage. With the lighting technician in mind, Quasar Science continues to design advanced lighting instruments for the Motion Picture, Television and Photographic industries.
Graphics/Logo: Brynne Wassel
Music By: Devin Delaney & Noisefloor LTD

Quasar Science
Advanced lighting solutions by lighting technicians. Creating Art with Fewer Limitations

Layne Marie:

Hello,

Kat:

And welcome to the walkie check.

Layne Marie:

Hey folks, welcome to the walkie check.

Kat:

I'm Kat Gorospe a script supervisor from Chicago.

Layne Marie:

And I'm Layne Marie Williams , a film director in Los Angeles, California. Thanks for tuning in on our very first episode. We're super excited to bring you the most creative and talented people out there to share their experiences, knowledge, and power.

Kat:

You know, even though this podcast is about all the entrepreneurs, creatives, and artists out there, filmmaking is our foundation. So that's how the walkie check came to be.

Layne Marie:

So to get the ball rolling, we're going to start with our very first official episode where we're going to be introducing ourselves and talking about the things that move us, inspire us, shake us , and the wisdom that we have to hopefully impart on our listeners.

Kat:

Are we going to sit back, drink some coffee, tea, and get to know each other and maybe we'll figure out if you like us or not.

Layne Marie:

But hashtag we've really hope you like us, here we go. Also prepare yourselves for lots of word voices and noises because that's kind of our MO.

Kat:

Yeah. And obnoxious laughing. I'm so sorry, just going to apologize. Right. Ahead of time, hahahahaha!

Layne Marie:

This episode is brought to you by our friends at quasar science, their new double rainbow and rainbow two lights are now available with the dual role pixelation . You have limitless effects for your next project. Visit our show notes to preorder yours today! Yeah. So Kat, what was the first aha moment When you decided that you wanted to be a filmmaker? For me, you know, everything kind of started off when I did journalism in high school and I love telling people's stories , um, being able to piece all those words together and you know , for me, writing just kinda came like all natural, but you know, journalism is very factual and your girl's pretty creative. I like to think so then I was like, you know, let's just, let's just go to film school, which is very risky to just kind of go in like that. And then I figured out I was really bad at script writing. Um , shout out to all of you , uh , screenwriters out there. I could never do what you do. I'm very, very poor at it. But after that figured out script supervision was a job and the rest is history. What about you Layne Maire? How did you, how did you get into this chaotic world? Hmm well, I've been saying for a long time that the whole thing was an accident , um, which I still sort of, I don't know that I see it so much as an accident anymore. It just happened, you know, the universe sort of just one thing led to another and here we are, I went to acting school. I did a lot of speech and debate and theater when I was in high school. And, you know, definitely experimented in a lot of different artistic mediums, but performance. I think in a lot of ways, it was the closest I could get to what felt very innate in me as far as like creating. So after I graduated from acting school and I had all this time on my hands, so long story short, I turned on my Canon power shot and started making more or less like an experimental documentary about some experiences I was having at the time and showed it to my best friend, then edited it together. And then I started screening it. And then all of a sudden I was absolutely obsessed with making films.

Kat:

Wow. It seems so natural for you.

Layne Marie:

So natty! Kat, I'm wondering what's one of the biggest challenges you've faced as a script supervisor in this industry?

Kat:

I feel like my biggest challenge is getting certain directors to take me seriously. A lot of the times it's an older person who is directing or like, you know, someone who's been in this industry longer than I have for sure. And they see this little five foot size of a garden gnome little girl, come on set and is like, hi, I'm your script supervisor. Uh, I can't, I can k ind o f tell you what to do. This is what you should be doing. This is what you shouldn't be doing. I know this is how you want to shoot the scene, but it's not going to work. And they don't take that well.

:

Hmm. But that's your job.

Kat:

I know. But they don't like that. They think because they're the director, they got to call all the shots, which, you know, I pick and choose your battles. But I feel like that would be the hardest thing, trying to get people to take me seriously, regardless of my age, I'm only 23. So a lot of the times it's 40 year old people looking down on me saying like, who , who is this? Who's this sitting next to me? You know, if there's anything I've learned from that it's regardless of your age, gender, you know, stand your ground. No . Cause you know, you know what you're doing, you obviously hired so you know how to do your job. So I've, I've definitely built a lot of confidence from that, trying to stand up to older folks.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. I can definitely relate to that in a lot of different ways

Kat:

Layne Marie , has there ever been a moment on set where you thought this project, or maybe even just the scene or shoot day, you didn't think it would work out or you wouldn't, you didn't think you'd get through your day?

Layne Marie:

Oh Gosh. I mean, I think I always feel that way, low key. U m, there's certainly always where I'm like, Oh my God, we still have so much to shoot. You know? And I think the hardship of directing, particularly in the indie world, the clock is very much working against you. At least that's how I feel. And that, that can be a real challenge because like for instance, I shot something recently where I w ould h ave loved to have done a couple more takes and I actually am not a big believer in doing a million takes. However, I did feel like we needed more and I had to have a couple moments where I was just like, you know, this is just going to be what it is we have to move on. We w ould just have to move on. So yeah, I would say, I always feel that way.

Kat:

I admire that though, that, you know, when you need to move on and aren't taking, you know, 17 takes .

Layne Marie:

Yeah. I would say I very seldom get to double digits with takes. Maybe once there's more resources and funding and time that will, that will be something I allow myself to do more, but I also have to be frank, like I have very high expectations of talent. I'm like, if you haven't gotten this by four or five, like, I want to give everybody that, especially the DP, like time to get in there and get what they need and for us to all be happy. However, again, like there just are times where you just, okay, the scene is going to be as good as it's going to be and we have to move on or we, you know, there's a chance we may not get to rap at a decent hour or there might be over time. I mean, there's just so many other factors. .

Kat:

Yeah And I feel like a lot of people don't take that into consideration or like , if you're pretty green, you don't know, it's like a domino effect that affects all these other things. So I'm glad, I'm glad you acknowledge the fact that, you know, other people are affected by how many takes you do on set.

Layne Marie:

Definitely. Always kind of like, okay, we're going to go for one more. And then if I have to say that again, like after I felt , I always feel like a little bit, like I just said that

Kat:

It was going to be the last one and it's not, I'm sorry.

Layne Marie:

You know, sometimes it's not me that needs it sometimes like sound needs another one or sometimes art does. So I think being a considerate director is pretty rare. Um, and it's something I'm certainly not perfect at, but I am always striving to consider my team.

Kat:

That's all that matters.

:

Yeah, baby. Okay. My turn, your union script supervisor.

Kat:

Yes I am.

:

Which is pretty dope.

Kat:

Thank you.

:

How would you describe being a union script supervisor being a script supervisor in general, to someone in the industry. That's looking to figure out what they want to do, but isn't necessarily at that point yet,

Kat:

I'm in local four 76 here in Chicago. I'm still pretty new. I haven't worked on many sets yet as in the union because lovely COVID hit right after I got into the union. Obviously a lot different than working your Indies. It's a little intimidating walking onto set because for me personally, all these people have been doing their jobs for longer than I've been alive. Frankly, if we're being honest and that's, that's pretty daunting. It's also reassuring to know that everyone is well-oiled knows how to do their job, knows how to communicate with you. And they're just constantly on it. There've been a couple of times where I worked second unit or covered for a Chicago PD and as intimidated as I was, I was just so impressed by how efficient everyone was. I didn't have to double check with art to make sure that everything was reset properly. Cause when I saw it on screen, it was already done. You know, all these people definitely know what they're doing and they're in the union for a reason. So it's refreshing to be able to focus on my work rather than have to worry about other departments. Yeah. But I'm definitely impressed with everyone's abilities onset . I love it.

Layne Marie:

Okay. So also like, while we're here talking about Rona , how have you been staying creative and busy and also what are you doing to elevate self care and take this time to rest and rejuvenate

Kat:

Been a wild ride. It's been lots of ebbs and flows of emotions. And I will say there have been so many times where I felt down on myself because this isn't how I pictured it. I didn't picture after graduating to be moving back home with my parents and not working because all throughout college and even a little bit afterwards, like I was constantly working constantly getting gigs, trying to find that understanding like forgiving yourself and understanding like, Hey, these things are out of your control. These things are out of your bubble. So to kind of make up for all those negative feelings I've just been doing, you know, a lot of painting, a lot of film photography, just a lot of creative things that aren't related to work

Layne Marie:

That excites me a little bit. I saw something yesterday , uh , that I felt was really meaningful that I'd love to share really quick. So this is from boss, babe on Instagram, they've got a great Instagram presence I really enjoy, which is their handle boss, babe dot Inc. And I frequently find myself inspired and regularly sharing their content on my stories. And this one in particular I thought of as Kat was just talking and it is in between your goals. Remember that there's a precious thing called life that has to be enjoyed.

Kat:

Ohhh

:

And I think that that's such a Testament to, you know, to folks that are artists, entrepreneurs, business owners, filmmakers, anything in that vein. I can only speak for myself, but I know I have absolutely had times in my life where I was completely consumed with what I do. And I've had other bouts in my life where I've had to really ask myself while in COVID in particular like, well, who am I when I'm not working?

Kat:

Ooh ,

:

That's one thing I would ask of our listeners is, you know, who are you when you're not working? And though this pandemic has obviously been very trying for everyone. And a lot of different things have come up and are being addressed. And we're really in the midst of , of creating a new world in a lot of ways, which is it's invigorating, but also very exhausting. So yeah, I just share that because I do think like in between the moments of, of your work, you've got to have a fulfilling life. Otherwise like it , my opinion, at least my art certainly suffers.

Kat:

Yeah.

:

So anyway, moving on.

Kat:

going. Actually, no going off of that, it's funny because when I first met you ,

:

Oh Boy!

Kat:

so , um,

:

I was producing,

Kat:

yes, you were , you were producing an indie short.

:

It was a good one.

Kat:

It was a good one.

:

It's made me very happy to see.

Kat:

Adullam

:

Yeah.

Kat:

By her friend. Regina Hoyles.

:

Yeah. Regina Hoyles

Kat:

Yes.

:

Fabulous filmmaker. We're definitely going to have her on our show. So stay tuned for that.

Kat:

Hi Regina.

:

Hiiii!

Kat:

So we were working on that and you just came on set. I did not know who you were, but you were wearing like this trench coat and your arri hat and you just walked on set. Like this was your movie. I was just like, I don't know who this chick is, but I am not messing with her, but you were also so sweet. You're like, hi, I'm Lynn Marie. And I was like, hi i'm Kat and you had like your, your clipboard with your name on it. And I was like, first thing that came on my head, I was like, she's a boss. She knows what she's doing. I was a little intimidated, but like in the best way possible, how are you so confident? You just seem so comfortable with yourself. And I feel like that's something that everyone should b e, you know?

Layne Marie:

So it's all act . I'm kidding. Um, I mean, it's not all an act. I , I , I would say that I definitely have some bones in me that allow me to embrace who I am. Growing up being the middle child of two boys. I really had to stand my own ground. And I think that my family was very loving and you know, we've, we've got our own stuff for certain. However, they did encourage that confidence and a lot of different ways and certainly the speech and debate the theater growing up in Alabama and like also being a little bit different in Alabama. Not quite feeling like I belonged and having different opinions and views about the world. I had to be really strong, especially to get o ut o f there, you know, to move away the way that I did.

Kat:

Yeah. Because you've moved around a lot. You went from Alabama to Philly.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. So Alabama Philly, Chicago, and now LA

Kat:

Wow. How do you say, so is nomadic the right word.

Layne Marie:

Yeah, You know, they say digital nomads, it's like kind of a thing. And I've always, I've always related to that in a lot of ways. Cause I would go anywhere. The work takes me.

Kat:

Got you . Yeah. Because I don't know. I mean, I feel like I'm the opposite of you because I've been in Illinois my whole life. I mean, going from the suburbs to the city is like nothing compared to how much you've been moving around. How do you stay so adaptable?

Layne Marie:

Well, I think I'm a very adaptable human being already. If somebody said like use three words to describe you, adaptable would definitely be one of them. So I think that that's just in my soul and I, I like change. I like newness. I like starting over. I like not becoming complacent. Yeah. I think that that's, that's where that comes from. So Kat ,

Kat:

hi.

Layne Marie:

What type of folks have you worked well with and what type of folks have you not worked well with? I feel like this industry allows you to find out very quickly who you gel with, you don't gel with. I've certainly discovered that along the way. So I wanted to gauge your thoughts on that.

Kat:

I do not work well with entitled people.

Layne Marie:

Mmmmm preach.

Kat:

I don't work well with close-minded people. I think that would be the top two entitled people. My favorite are department heads, who from a script supervisor's mind who don't keep track of their own continuity. There've been so many times where, for example, let's say it's wardrobe every single time we reset or do a new scene, they have to ask, Oh, is this the right outfit? Is their belt looped the right way left or right. Whatever. And I don't mind answering those questions from time to time. Obviously that's what I'm here for. And giving you reference photos that give it all to you. I'll be your fairy godmother. But if it's constant, it's like, you're just, I have to take the extra five minutes when I could be helping art reset a very intricate kitchen scene or something like that. So not only am I taking care of wardrobe and taking care of props, makeup, making sure that the director is cool with changes that we made the list can go on. I could talk about it all day. Also open-minded people, I feel like this goes for anyone working in any creative, in any field you're working with. People got to be open-minded and understand that this is a team effort. And if you're a little too stubborn, it, it just opens a canvas.

Layne Marie:

that's truth.

Kat:

Yeah. It slows everything down. You know, everyone here is here because they know how to do their job well. So yeah.

Layne Marie:

I feel you . Yeah, it can be, it can be tricky on set sometimes because usually you've got a lot of different personalities coming together. I mean, I think that's one reason, again, it's so important to find your people like as a director, for instance, I've definitely found folks that I know I regularly like to hire now. Is it always my call who gets hired? No, but I certainly always give recommendations. Sometimes there's already, people hired. Sometimes they go with somebody they know.

Kat:

Right.

Layne Marie:

That is one thing that I really love about the position that I'm in though. It's like, it's a hire all the people I adore.

Kat:

That's awesome. That's I love being on a set where it's like, I know a good handful of people already, and then you just kind of work well together and the vibes are there and it's a good time. It makes, it makes for a 12 plus hours. days a lot easier.

Layne Marie:

Yeah, absolutely. When you look at your career so far, was there a moment where you were like, why, why am I here?

Kat:

Yeah, the very, very, very, very first film I ever worked on. And if we're being honest, it was the student film back at Columbia. Um , I graduated Columbia college, Chicago class 19, and it was my junior year. That's when I took the script supervision class. And in order to pass, you have to work on either , uh , directing three or practicum. I ended up working on a practicum called blood orange with a bunch of lovely folks that I still work with today. But at that point I had never been on a film set and I was doing very poorly in the, in the classroom. It just, wasn't showing up to class, wasn't doing the work. And I kind of felt like I was being thrown into the sharks when I got on set. And I was like, what did I get myself into? And I genuinely thought I was gonna have my butt chewed out and serve to me. I was just so overwhelmed with the job, ask anyone who worked on the set. I was a hot mess day one. But after those three days I did the job, I got the job done and I was told I did decent. But after that I was like, I am never working on a film set again.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. I was there like at that said I'm out.

Kat:

I'm never after ever have to do this again. Just it for the grade, you know, helped everyone with that lovely movie. And Oh , also it was shot on film. It wasn't digital.

Layne Marie:

Oh Wow.

Kat:

So first set shot on film.

Layne Marie:

That's a lot.

Kat:

Yeah. There's there's no playback. There's.

Layne Marie:

whew. So you're just like Trying to communicate adjustments.

Kat:

Yes. Yes. Looking back now. I love working on film. If anyone ever asks me to do it again.

Layne Marie:

Yes, no . Yeah. And I feel like that's pretty, pretty standard. I mean your first film being really difficult. Gosh. Yeah. I mean, that sounds, that sounds about right.

Kat:

If you could pick one of yours to do again, which one would it be

Layne Marie:

Just a film in general than I would. I would recreate it.

Kat:

Yeah.

Layne Marie:

Can I say all of them?

Kat:

This is your podcast presented by legacy Marie pictures. You can say all of them

Layne Marie:

Yeah. That's not really true though. Cause at a certain point you just have to move on, you know, you have to like make the thing finished , the thing, screen the thing and all the while be moving on. There's actually this great Andy Warhol quote that I've been referencing since I started making films, which I'm going to butcher, but essentially it's like, while people are deciding how they feel about the work that you've created, you're already making something new. And I think that that's , it's like such sound advice and it's something that I definitely remind myself of because you know, the thing about creating media is like, I often say like it lives on and it's not like theater where it's like, people will see this one performance and that's it. And then it will live forever in their minds and in their bodies if they were affected by it. I mean, it's this medium that like lives on and on and on. And that's a beautiful thing. And it's also hard as a creator because you know, I look back at some of my work and I don't feel like it represents me as a director or writer or creator today. So you have to find the parts about it that still do, and then chalk up the rest and move on. So yeah, I feel like while I jokingly say all of them at this point, probably none of them, cause it's just, it's time to create bigger things. It's time to work with collaborators that I know I really work well with and all that kind of stuff.

Kat:

Sometimes your projects don't represent who you are today. I think that's normal. Cause we're all constantly growing and evolving. Our aesthetics are changing.

Layne Marie:

So what's the most satisfying aspect of the filmmaking process for you?

Kat:

I think my favorite part is when I have gotten to the point where I've developed a good relationship with my director, because I'm sitting next to them for 12 plus hours a day, you know, you really get to know someone. But my favorite is when you can see when a director loves a specific moment in a take, me being a part of filmmaking is being a part of something that's bigger than yourself. It's a collaborative process. And just seeing people around you be so satisfied with the product. It's just no feeling like it. It's what makes all the hard work worthwhile.

Layne Marie:

I love that. That's beautiful. Kat. What are you most excited about accomplishing this podcast?

Kat:

I really hope that this podcast turns into something that people will want to listen to when they're getting ready in the morning or just on the drive to work and something that makes them laugh a little, maybe cry, a little happy tears and just feel good. And like you said earlier, I hope people take something away from it. Whether or not you're in the creative field. Because at the end of the day, I feel like we have a lot of things to relate to just in general. So I hope it becomes something that people love. What about you? What do you hope this podcast becomes

Layne Marie:

That it becomes a resource for folks that are looking to fill their cup with new information, about how to get into the industry.

Kat:

What's your biggest advice for someone who is trying to get into the industry?

Layne Marie:

Oh, just keep it fun. Keep it Fun. Have fun as much. And as long as humanly possible, because a lot of this work is not fun and you know, the nitty gritty aspects of it, you have to have a lot of really difficult conversations because working with people is hard and that's what filmmaking is. You are again, it's a lot of different personalities mixed together, working long hours, running on fumes, trying to communicate, you know, like it's, it's challenging. It's a sport. It's truly a sport. Yeah. I think keep it fun. Know why you love it and never lose sight of that.

Kat:

Wow. Amen.

Layne Marie:

It's not deep, deep enough for ya.

Kat:

I love it. I love we got , we got to go a little deep sometimes so people can take us seriously.

Layne Marie:

What about you? What's your, what would be your advice to Folks looking to break in ?

Kat:

I would Say my biggest advice is keep asking questions, even if they're dumb, because you'll, there's going to be a time where you think, ah , I can just like guesstimate this, but then it turns out you cant guesstimate it and it messes people up. And then someone's going to be like, well, why didn't you just ask, you're going to ask yourself. I didn't. I just ask. So I feel better to play it safe. If someone, if someone thinks it's a dumb question, it's not the end of the world, but yeah. Ask your questions and also stand your ground regardless of who you are, but also be nice to people. Geez , you can stand ground while still being a decent human being.

Layne Marie:

Kindness is very important, especially in this industry that goes a long way. And yeah.

Kat:

People remember,

Layne Marie:

People do remember.

Kat:

people, remember how you make them feel.

Layne Marie:

I know, I remember.

Kat:

I remember a hundred percent. So for all you listening, make sure you're nice.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. Yeah. And again, you know, it's, nobody's perfect. We all have things to work on and grow from. I think though, something I've been thinking about a lot lately, especially while being in LA and I say this pretty often is you never know who somebody might become.

Kat:

Ooh,

Layne Marie:

You never know who that PA might turn around and be someday. So Be nice. Wow . Okay. Kats. So as a Women of color in this industry, what can people like me do to better elevate and support you

Kat:

Hard for me to answer that because, and this is going to sound very privileged. There've only been a handful of times where ethnicity has problems for me. It's just the fact, you know, going back to what I said earlier, people not taking me seriously because of my gender age size, whatever you want to call it, not just being a woman in general has all its struggles in the industry. We've definitely been moving towards getting better about it. There's been more people speaking up, which is lovely, but I feel like women in general need more recognition for what they put up with.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. I mean, it's, it is an extremely white male dominated industry. And you know, there are certainly some fabulous allies out there. However, I mean, yeah, there's, it's very oversaturated . It can be a challenge to break into it. It's gotten a little bit better as I've gotten older, but you know, I've definitely had moments of feeling like I have to work hard to be taken seriously, especially like for directing. I mean that, that role in particular is so, I mean, it's just what everybody wants to do or they think that that's what they want to do. And then, you know, they do it and they're like, Oh , okay. Maybe not. You know? Um, because at the end of the day, at least in my eyes directing is having a lot of people turning and looking at you and being like, now what?

Kat:

Yeah, I, a hundred percent back that up. I could see that. What's the hardest thing for you personally.

Layne Marie:

There's a lot of different challenges, especially now, again, like trying to make films in the time of COVID like I did the , I did the shoot recently where I had a mask on and I had PPE on and it was probably the hardest thing I've ever done. Please try to lead with a lot of exuberance and fun and also seriousness cause I'm trying to, you know, move things quickly.

Kat:

wham bam thank you mam

Layne Marie:

Exactly. And also a place where people can be like very expressive. And I found being masked up to that point, made it very difficult to do all of those things. Really. The way that I work on set is I'll be up monitor, I'll say cut I'll quickly walk over to talent and give them some notes and give them some adjustments and feedback and give them different things to play with. And maybe I'll give a note or two to camera lighting, et cetera. And I do a lot of that with my face.

Kat:

Ooh,

Layne Marie:

I show a lot in my face, especially with talent, like when we're trying to achieve a certain kind of moment, cause I'm not a believer in line readings. Like that's the last thing I make a very specific point to never give talent a line reading. So a lot of that means I have to like, I have to change it up and improvise a little bit so that I'm not literally giving them a line reading if, if we're working on like one specific line or piece of text. And so when I ran over, not gosh, when I quickly walked over and was trying to communicate things recently, I just, I was shielded, you know, like all I had to work with were my eyes and my voice was like muffled a little bit too because in the mask and then every time I would brush over, I would end up hitting myself in the face. Cause I'm like rushing over and I'm like hitting this shield on my face. And so working with those parameters was extremely challenging. And I know that that's just like, if I want to make films right now, this is just like what I have to do. And I'm like willing to suck it up and do it and get tested all the time and do whatever I need to do. It's really tough though. Cause I , I need my face. And then my voice.

Kat:

if those struggles With dealing with PPE in being able to communicate with your talent, what, what have you done to kind of work around that?

Layne Marie:

Breathe?

Kat:

Well, I hope your breathing during work. does in general,

Layne Marie:

you breathe trust, let go. There's only so much in your control. I think just having a good attitude and , and you know, I think the biggest thing of all is just remember that nothing lasts forever. This too shall pass. If you, again, if you want to make work right now, I think there's a certain amount of acceptance and endurance. You have to be willing to lean into in order to accomplish making a movie right now budgets have increased because of COVID and all the stipulations and protocol that comes with that. So be prepared to raise more money, set aside several thousand dollars to just take care of COVID alone and you know, yeah. I mean there's a certain amount of like deciding if it's worth it. And you know, we all got to pay rent for many of us making films is literally our life or maybe not our life, but it is our careers. So I've just gotten into a head space about it where I'm like, okay, this is just what I must do. I have to try and have as good of an attitude about it as I can. And just again, keep in mind that hopefully a vaccine will be here soon. And in the meantime we got to just Make it work.

Kat:

I wish everyone had that attitude because so many people don't and I'm a firm believer that you are, who you surround yourself with. I'm glad I'm surrounding myself with, you know ,

Layne Marie:

so much sweetness today in the booth.

Kat:

There's gotta be.

Layne Marie:

I Just to take a special moment, To thank our Executive Producers of Noisefloor LTD. If your not familiar with Noisefloor you should become familiar with Noisefloor you can check out their website. They are a post sound production house, they also have fabulous location mixers really any kind of sound service you need for making videos this is the place to go.

Kat:

Also, Thank you. Thank you. Thank you to my very good friend Brynn Wassel for giving us our lovely logo. I can't wait to see it as an actual neon sign one day.

Layne Marie:

We got grand plans you all. So definitely stay tuned. Be sure to follow us on Facebook and instagram @thewalkiecheck and @legacymariepictures

Rona, and staying creative
Kat & Lanye Marie Meet
Digital Nomad
Who do you gel with
why, why am I here?
Do Over
What's the most satisfying aspect of the filmmaking process
Getting in to the industry
Women of Color & Being a Woman
Hard Things
dealing with PPE
Wrap up and Shout outs