The Walkie Check- A holistic talk with creatives

Go for Regina Hoyles

July 07, 2021 Layne Marie Williams & Kat Gorospe Season 1 Episode 2
The Walkie Check- A holistic talk with creatives
Go for Regina Hoyles
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In this episode we will introduce Regina Hoyles to you. We will discuss everything from women in film to different paths to making a dream a reality. Regina Hoyles was born and raised in the south suburbs of Chicago, IL, Regina Hoyles is an award-winning actor, writer, and producer who got her start in the entertainment industry as early as nine years old. She is a graduate of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts where she received her BFA in Drama and minored in the Business of Entertainment. Regina created NAPS, an original web series which screened at festivals such as the NYC Webfest and NYU’s Fusion Film Festival. Regina wrote, produced, directed, and starred in her first short film entitled ADULLAM which premiered as an official selection in the 2020 Bentonville Film Festival and is now airing on REVOLT TV’s anthology series, “Short and Fresh”. Adullam was awarded Best Black Lens Film at the 2020 Sidewalk Film Festival as well as Best Narrative Film in the 2020 Argo’s Untold Stories Short Film Awards. She is the Founder/Producer of her production company RLH Productions, which serves to highlight the work of emerging artists of color, particularly amplifying Black voices and all their complexities across genres. She produced the short film TENDER (dir. Felicia Pride) which received the Lionsgate/STARZ Producer Award at the Blackstar Film Festival. As an actor, she can be seen featured on shows such as THE MARVELOUS MS. MAISEL (Amazon), THE CHI (Showtime), ALL RISE (CBS) and  9-1-1: LONE STAR (FOX). 

Regina is currently based in Los Angeles, CA.


Regina Hoyles
Adullam


Hosts: Layne Marie Williams & Kat Gorospe
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Layne Marie and Kat:

Hello and welcome to the walkie check.

Layne Marie:

Hey folks. Welcome to the walkie check.

Kat:

I'm Kat Gorospe, a script supervisor from Chicago.

Layne Marie:

And I'm Layne Marie Williams, a film director in Los Angeles, California. We're super excited to be working with our friends at Noisefloor to bring you the most creative and talented people out there to share their experiences, knowledge, and power.

Kat:

This episode is brought to you by film craft studio gear. Own The Icon. Filmcraft Studio Gear , the #1 Trusted Brand of Pro-Grade Director Chairs In Film & Entertainment. Kat.

Layne Marie:

And Layne Marie.

Layne Marie and Kat:

for Regina.

Regina Hoyles:

Go for Regina.

Kat:

So today for our first guest , we're flying in miss Regina Hoyles

Speaker 2:

Regina hoiles is an actor writer, producer, and director while she can be seen featured in shows like 911 Lone star, The Chi and several others. She also has her own boutique production company, R L H productions. She's currently based in Los Angeles. However, we had the pleasure of working with her here in her home state of Illinois.

Kat:

We worked with her on her short film, titled Adullam, which she wrote, produced, directed, and started. The film was entirely shot in the suburbs of Chicago and it premiered as an official selection in the 2020 buttoned film film festival and is now airing on revolt TV's anthology series short n fresh it's now a successful, mostly virtual film festival run racking up awards like best black lens film at the 2020 sidewalk film festival, as well as bus narrative film, and the 2020 Argos untold stories , short film awards. coming in hot with all those awards.

Layne Marie:

coming in. Super hot. Yeah.

Kat:

Welcome Regina.

Regina Hoyles:

Hey, I am so happy to be here. Thanks for having me.

Kat:

Oh man. It's been a minute for sure. Since we worked on Adullam, what was that? Two, three years ago?

Regina Hoyles:

Yes . Tech . I know pandemic just ruined our sense of time too . It was two years ago. We're coming up on like two years. Exactly. Yeah

Layne Marie:

Man. Yeah. Cause what I'm trying to remember, like what month? Like we.

Regina Hoyles:

may.

Layne Marie:

Yeah, that's right. Cause it wasn't , it was kinda nice out.

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah . And it was like raining super heavy. I remember like one the night before it was like 40 days and 40 nights type of flood. And then like the whole, like lot we were meant to shoot in completely cleared out. So I'm like, thank you god, hahaha.

Layne Marie:

Yeah , yeah. And you know, like I just remember, so Kat was a script sup on that shoot and then I helped produce. And um, it was honestly like one of them, at least for me. And I, I can't speak for you guys, but it was one of my all time favorite shoots.

Kat:

Oh yeah, for sure. I just remember , uh , when you picked me up from the train station in the U hall, you were so bright and you're like, Hey, are you ready to make a movie? I was like, oh my God, I don't know you. But yeah, let's , Let's, let's make a movie and Regina, you and your mom were so nice. You let me stay at your house, which I really appreciated. I got the meet Bucky, your d og. Sweet baby angel. That was so fun. Oh my god.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. I remember like myself and some of the other crew like stayed in an Airbnb and we just had so much fun, you know? Like you just, you made it, you really made it happen. And um, I hope that you look back at that film with a lot of pride because I feel like it's gone so far and I mean, I'm thrilled to see whatever it is that you do next. So we'll talk about some of that.

Kat:

Yeah. So my biggest question, Regina, cause you were the first director I've worked with who also acted what's that like for you getting to do both in the same project?

Regina Hoyles:

Um, well that was my second time doing that. Um, my first major undertaking was a web series entitled naps where I was wearing a lot of hats. And so I noticed, although it was like just two products I've done since then. Um, I noticed that I liked to slim down how many roles I take on. And I definitely feel at this point in my life that directing and acting simultaneously is not something I necessarily want to do. Um, I, I really value, you know, like mastering crafts I've the most I've been doing is acting. I've been acting for 16 years professionally now. And so like, I know that for me, I love when I'm able to like fully immerse myself , um , in a character. And I find that easier to do, like say if I'm, if I written a project, I can do that. Or if I'm producing, I still can manage that. But directing, I don't know, maybe that's just like the me who likes to seek external validation, but coming out of like conservatory training I'm so like used to having so much chatting in my ear, like, what do you mean by that? What are you saying with this? You know, and like really like giving me that extra, that extra push. And so I would say that it was a really rewarding experience for me because I just gained so much knowledge about myself as an artist. And I was surrounded by a powerhouse team. Okay. Like from everybody from you Kat! I remember like asking you, like which take do you think that was like super good? And then having Taylor as my first Ad shout out to Taylor, he kept me in check made sure I wasn't like stepping outside of any of the roles I had confirmed I would be doing. Um , and then Layne, like there was so much that she did that was just making things seamlessly happen and I didn't even realize until after the fact. I was like wait Layne too care of that? When was she doing this? So I learned that there was just like so much value in having a team you trust around you. But for me as an artist, I know that I really love when I'm able to devote myself. Um, and I feel like it maybe, if I wasn't , um, producing, I could potentially like act indirect in something simultaneously, but I know that I'm very, very , um , intentional and careful, like when I do that, you know?

Layne Marie:

Yeah . And I think it's with Indies in particular, you just saw, especially if you're self producing , you just end up doing so much.

Regina Hoyles:

I totally agree. You know, I'm very much of the mindset that , um, your gift will make room for you. I believe it is so awesome to have multiple talents and skills and , uh , recognize that. But I do think there is so much value in mastering a singular craft . You know, notice I said, your gift singular will make room for you. And a lot of times that's how a lot of people get their starts and new doors open because they have truly put the work in, in one area and are like, okay, I feel like I have gained enough knowledge, wisdom experience in this field that I'm now able to open myself up because it is the age of the multihyphenate. But I believe that at the same time, because that's kind of a thing, praised a lot of people don't necessarily go deeper into what that means. A lot of the most successful multihyphenate are the ones that have learned the power of mastery you know, as an actor, you know, I was in training and like, I know Sanford Meisner said like it takes 20 years to become an actor for real, for real. And so like if you take that mindset with you in any craft, whether you're in this industry or not, like you just become one who has, you're just like ascending master, I feel like, you know, you really have like honed in on what it is you're good at and truly dedicated yourself to the, to the craft. And in that regard, like you become undeniable. Just , I think that that's, that should be the mark of someone w ho's great. You know?

Kat:

Whew. Speaking the truth jeez, I was just like, oh my God. Well , I wasn't, I wasn't ready for that.

Layne Marie:

Love it . Yeah.

Kat:

Going off of that is, would you say active would be your gift? Which one would you consider out of all the roles directing, writing, acting, producing?

Regina Hoyles:

I would say the earliest have been like acting and writing. Um, writing was something that , um, didn't come to me early professionally as acting did, you know, I've literally been professionally acting since I was nine. Got my S.A.G Card at 12. Um, so with writing though, it's something that I had kind of like had always been doing and not realizing that's what I was doing. Like creating the stories that I would act in myself. Um, but yeah, acting is definitely the one where I have invested the absolute most time, money and energy in my life thus far. Um, and then writing, I feel like is next in line and honing that craft. I noticed in the pandemic, I was really taking in a lot of knowledge, taking a lot of virtual classes, workshops, all of that. I'm honing in that whole business aspect of writing, you know, like I have scripts just ready to go. And when I make my projects, I'm typically the one writing them. But when it comes to like entering the , the world of , of like pitching and, and all of that. And what does staffing mean and what does that look like? Um, like this past year was the first year I've ever had a literary agent. So understanding what, like representation looks in that space, you know, versus I've been repped as an actor since I was maybe 10 years old. So yeah, I would say like those two, but if had to like really slim that it would probably be acting. I just know that I'm, I am in that world for sure. When I'm, when I'm acting.

Layne Marie:

I love that. That's so powerful. And I can definitely see that for you like a hundred percent. I mean, I can't, I can't wait to work with you at some point in that way, you know, I'm just like, what is that role going to come along? Let's do it roles . Plural.

Regina Hoyles:

Thank you. Thank you. Amen. Received.

Layne Marie:

As far as like , um , getting representation goes, whether that's, you know, through S.A.G or a literary agent, I feel like our listeners would definitely want to hear more about like what that process was like for you.

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah. So, you know, everyone's like journey of course is going to look differently, but to tell you mine , um, I, I was very adamant when I was younger about being, wanting to be an actor. I was the kid who, you know, adults ask you, what do you want to be? And like, it's like it astronaut. And they're like, oh, that's cute. And so like, I tell people, like , I want to be an actor. I was very precocious. I would look them dead in the face. Like, no , no, like is really going to happen. Like you have to understand like at five. And so my mother liked didn't take me like that much seriously until I was , um, maybe nine years old. And you know , um , my mom doesn't have any knowledge of the industry, but she just believed that I would, I would not let it go. And so she took it upon herself to do everything she could and researching and reaching out to agents, reaching out to classes. That was the first step. And I believe I went to some school and I went to a big convention. And I remember there was some, there was a good response from agents who had been present. And again, I was like 9 or 10 at this time. And that was my first introduction to representation out in Chicago. And then I had another agent that I moved over to when I was younger. And I had been with them before I moved to LA. Um, I've been with them for maybe Ooh, like 13 years . I'm not really sure if I'm misquoting. I forgetting how old I am. It was, it was a long , It was a long time. But , um, that was my first experience with representation. Kind of always just having it from like my mom's just realizing like, oh, this is what she wants to do. And her stepping out of her way to do that research. And so then from there, like I went to NYU and going to college, there was a new agent that came in to the agency I was already at. And she in a way became like this, geez , first of all, a powerhouse. And she just, I developed a relationship with her as an adult, whereas like a whole, whole lot of my time acting as a child, you know, there was this main person who was talking to my mom, communicating through me, but when this new person, while I was in college, came along, you know, she's still representing me while I'm out in New York. She says, when are you coming home? We can send you out when we're here. And all of that. And from there, like she just truly been a ride or die. And , um, after that, you know, it just was matter of me like creating my own work has truly been the through line for any representation I've had so like when I made my web series that attracted the attention of a manager and when I made my short film, when I made Adullam like that attracted my current agent, as well as my literary agent. And I , again, like these were things that weren't necessarily expected. They were just kind of drawn to me because of the work that I was creating. So yeah. I hope that was like detailed .

Layne Marie:

Totally. No, I mean, I love that it happened, it happened really organically. I think that that's, you know, a lot of times that's what it takes. Like it's just like that old phrase it's like build it and they will come, you know, like, I think there's so much value to that. So for the literary agent, so did you like send them the film or did you send them the script or like, how did you, what did they want to see? Like what was that process like?

Regina Hoyles:

So even there, and I'm very much still navigating this space because the truth is I can't be a serious regular on a show and be staffed in one at the same time, unless it is literally my show. So we have to prioritize, but for me acquriring her...

Layne Marie:

I mean...Let's make it happen.

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah, exactly. I have a friend who she it's so funny because she is very much like we're on the same track in terms of career, but she's on the agency side, but we're still like, cool. And so we kind of always kept in touch. And so as she moved around and leveled up in her career as an agent and I did as an actor, we're still in touch. And so like, I'm checking in with her, just like asking her what's up and just seeing how she's doing. She's asking me what I'm up to. I literally just sent her my short, not genuinely not thinking anything of it and then find out like she sent it to her boss and I got her agency who like, runs like talent, like at it. And I'm just like, oh, wow, cool. She's like, yeah . Do you want a meeting? I'm like, oh sure. And you know, I was like hesitant at first. I thought it was all a , it was a surprise to me. And so upon doing that, like meeting with them, we vibed immediately. And like my friends, like your friends are your best advocates when you have a good one, like they truly are. And so she's like, yeah, she writes too , what she did this, and this is everything else that she does. And we're bringing in, you know, new agents to represent people on the literary field. And so she just took it upon herself to ask me, like, if I had anything else, I have pilots that I've written and I just sent them to her. And , um , she was like, yeah, you want to meet with our literary agent next week? And I was like, yeah, sure. So like, that's pretty much like how that happened . So yeah.

Kat:

Yeah. Crazy how that all kind of just happened, like organically and, you know, that's, that's the type of people you want to keep in your life. I always preach to friends like you are who you surround yourself with and you know, that friend of yours, like , that's the type of person you want. It's not like you asked her to like, oh, can you like send this to like, whoever, you know, she , like you said, she just did it. And then they're like, Hey, let's have a meeting. And it's just, you know, that's , that's how, that's how you kind of like move up in this like, field with like genuine people like that.

Regina Hoyles:

Definitely. Definitely. Yeah.

Layne Marie:

That's awesome. Yeah. And just to name a couple of other roles that you've played, you were Enid and the Marvelous Mrs. Maizel, Tammy and The Chi and Tiara Gage and all rise. Indie versus TV. What do you feel like the differences are there and do you prefer one over the other or, you know, they're just different cups of tea.

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah, no, I would definitely say every set is different. Every set is different. And having had been fortunate enough to have that experience of like , um, cable as well as network, you know, network is a little different. It really depends on the show, honestly, though, because like The Chi really gave me indie vibes . It was so much inclusivity on that set.

Kat:

I love that set.

Regina Hoyles:

I do too . I was like, I saw so much of myself on the other side of the screen, you know, and working behind the scenes and everyone was so freaking welcoming. It just felt like a family reunion they're two different type of way. Yeah . It was wonderful. You know? And so I think that one of the biggest things between like indie and like television world is television world. It's almost like a rule that you don't live by this rule. You got to your fire, everybody stay in your lane, do not at all step outside into somebody else's and you know, I shot , um , in COVID too . So I , it was even more strict as far as like, please remain in your zones. Like let's not like put anybody at risk, but I think that's just the feel of indie is you got to do everything at once at some point. Like, that's just how it is, you know? And I think that I love the network and television because there's a broader reach. And depending on the story you're telling, it just makes it that much more impactful. But I guess the truth of the matter is if you've impacted just one person you've impacted, like enough.

Kat:

I could totally relate to that. It's funny. Cause I'm working on the show tomorrow. I've been , um , yeah, I've been like working on their second unit. It's been super fun and completely agree with Regina. I love the cast, loved the crew . So welcoming and you know, working on different shows. Like it could, you can kind of feel like the new kid, like in school so it can be nerve wracking sometimes.

Regina Hoyles:

Yes! And that's what I'm saying. Like with the shy, I felt so welcomed. You know, my, my scenes were with , um, Ms. Burgundy baker who was incredibly talented and Ms . Hyla and Robin , it was like, it was so nice, but they just truly, it was like, oh, well, come on in. Hey Tammy. And then with Jett , the director who was also incredible , um, they really made me feel welcome or like I could come back here like next week or the week after like that, just that ease the ease of , um, joining the cast felt so amazing.

Layne Marie:

Yeah! And I feel like that's so important, like when we're making movies, because it's really hard work, the hours are really long, you know, depending on what kind of production it is, like I'm shooting something right now. And today's my off day. And I'm like very exhausted, but like, it's so important to just check yourself and be like, but I'm doing, you know, I'm doing what I love. And like set comradery is so important. And like from every single person from talent to the producer, to the script sup, to the key PA like it's so important to , to like lead with kindness. Cause it gets stressful. And like people get, you know, like it's just one of those things where like I was telling somebody the other day, like, don't use it . You just can't, you have to choose to not take things personally on set.

Kat:

Definitely. And you never know like what these relationships are gonna turn out to be, you know, like if you told me when, like when I accepted the job on Regina set, if you told me we would be here now doing a podcast like altogether, I'd be like, you're crazy. What , what are you talking about? Well , like I have no idea, but it just goes to show like, you never know what's going to happen. You don't know what connections you're gonna make and you know, I'm going to be all connected.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. Me too!

Regina Hoyles:

Me too!

Layne Marie:

So we've talked a lot about filmmaking. We've talked a little bit about like what your process with getting reps and all that good stuff is. And um, you know, I'm wondering like, what are some of your interests outside of filmmaking?

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah. And do I have some , uh.....

All:

hahahahahhahaah!

Regina Hoyles:

Um , I love, I love cooking. I've been saying, because I noticed that low key would say this when I was younger, but it's stuck. Like if I wasn't an actor, a writer , producer, director, all that, like I would be a chef. Um , and it's probably because it's a creative outlet. I've been really thrown down not to brag, hahaha!

All:

hahahhaha!

Layne Marie:

You're making me hungry

Regina Hoyles:

For sure, for sure. I love cooking, reading. I'm doing better at that. Cause like I last year I , I remember making it a goal, but in 2021 I've already liked surpassed. Like what last year's readings were. Um, I'd definitely say cooking is probably the biggest one that sticks out to me.

Layne Marie:

So you're in LA. How long have you been there and what's that been like so far?

Regina Hoyles:

I've been in LA since September, 2018. And I found a community very early upon coming to LA and that truly made a world of difference. Whether it be a community within my alumni network community in the black community, like just my mentor figures came quick and I just really felt like I was being protected. There was something over me, you know? And so I think that that really assisted with my transition. And I know that there's a lot of people who, when they make that big move, they feel like they're flopping or failing just because they don't have anyone to surround you, you know, and a good group of folks to surround you. Like you said, Kat , like you truly are who you surround yourself with. And so I think that that was super important for me and making it feel less like, oh my gosh, my childhood is slipping from my fingers. And like, even, even now, like I feel it slipping away, but it's more like a , okay, I'm going to start waving intentionally goodbye from me. You know, it's not like, oh wait, hold on. But yeah, that's, that's been my journey thus far.

Layne Marie:

Nice. Yeah. I feel you about the like childhood. I've actually been thinking a lot about how to reconnect to like my younger self recently. And um, and I feel like it's so important, especially as creatives to like, not lose sight of like twelve-year-old Regina and you know, how can you still, you know, how can you still stay true to her while also going about paying bills and just trying to survive and like communicating well with others and like giving yourself grace and all these, you know, all these hard things that we have to do in order to like, keep going. Especially in this business. That's like, you know, people, people have egos very much in our business and what's been like a challenge for you, Regina. What's like a moment where you were just like, I I'm out, you know? Or like, I think I'm out, but you kept going.

Regina Hoyles:

I think that, I think that we all have those moments. I feel like that's a , um, a timing problem. A lot of us are so like hopeful that things will work out in our own timing. And like, I do believe in divine order, divine timing and that everything comes when it's supposed to. And so even when you've been hitting the ground, as hard as you can hit in the payment , really like putting in work, you're like, why am I not getting where I think I should be getting? Because maybe because you weren't supposed to get there. Maybe you're supposed to go somewhere else, you know? And I feel like you should not want anything. That's not for you. You should not want that. And I feel like just really letting the , and it's so easy to say, but how many of us truly like let it rest? You know, I feel like , let me be transparent. Like, you know, I can pray and say, God, I know you're gonna do this in my career. And like, I know you're gonna do it in your timing, but in the back of my head, I'm like, I kind of want you to do it like next week.

All:

Hahahahahaha!

Regina Hoyles:

Like that would be really great. You know, it's all I feel like how many of us are really like surrendering to our life's journey, letting it truly take us wherever it's meant to take us. And I think that that's really important and recognizing like, Hey, I am where I'm supposed to be. Whether or not I think this is where I'm supposed to be. Um , I'm here, you know, and it's really funny. This might be like a little deep to share, but I was talking to my attorney who is very much like a grandmotherly figure to me at times. And I was saying to her, I was just like heart to heart. And I'm like, you know, I feel like I could be hard on myself at times or whatever. And she was like, and you know, it's good to be hard on yourself as long as you're progressing, but if you're doing the best, you can lay it , like lay off. Like there's no reason to go in on yourself . Like the world, the world is going to go in on you. Things are going to like give you a tough time. Period. You know? So if you know, and you can, you can truly know in your heart, your BS meter will go off when you are doing your absolute best, like this , just give, like, give it away, just let it go. Let whatever's meant to happen to you and your career and your life. Like it is not in your hands, you know?

Layne Marie:

Yeah, for sure. What have you been binge-watching and like also you mentioned that you've been reading and I would love to hear, like about what you've been reading and if you have any recommendations for our listeners.

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah . I'm definitely off the top of my head. I started my year like this, and I felt so fresh. I read , um, uh, Cecily Tyson's autobiography and it was so impactful in so many ways. I felt so connected to her and just like several, I , I, she's just, she's incredible. She's a pioneer. And I resonate with her being very selective about the roles she accepted and that she was even willing to like go out for, like, I'm at a place in my career where I'm able to , um , be firm in my yeses and my nose. Um, and, you know, I feel like as an actor, we're so often like, accustomed to saying like, you know, I just should accept every opportunity that comes my way, everything that gets put in my email, like I just say yes, yes, yes, too . But like, I think the pandemic it's truly was a divine pause. Cause it made you realize like what, what really matters like here in life. And I believe that , um, Cicely Tyson lived that her whole trajectory reading her story and how she was both an artist and an activist and use her platform incredibly intentionally in her living incredibly intentionally was so inspiring to me and a great way to start off my year. Another one that I probably have to give another read. Cause I like to read it every so often is the Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. Um, it always offers you some new perspective depending on where you're at in your life, but yeah. And then binge watching, you know, I've been watching a lot of, a lot of different things for the first time I saw Breaking Bad and that made it truly one of my favorite shows.

Layne Marie:

Such a great show!

Regina Hoyles:

It's incredible! You know my favorite show of all time is fresh Prince of Bel air! I love will Smith. Like two of my, like big, my grades who are role models need Sicily and like wWill Smith. Like that's the type of TV family I desire. I really immerse myself in a lot of independent film. One of the standouts to me , God Lee was on Rhada Blank's 40 year old version. Oh my gosh. Oh my God. I was clapping. I was like in the room rocking back and forth, like, yeah , it was a Radha . Um, I think that it was a really awesome opportunity to tap into more of the indie, the indie world and see a lot of films I might not have otherwise seen , um, traveling around like that.

Layne Marie:

Yeah . Yeah. And Roger's movie was black and white

Regina Hoyles:

Is sure was . Yeah. incredible.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. I thought that that was like such a cool choice and like, it's something that hasn't been done in a w hile and gosh, it makes me, I mean, I've been wanting to shoot something on film and I also want to do something in black and white and I just, I'm so excited for her and like her trajectory, like I've read so many interviews with her and like a really cool thing to like, watch her!

Kat:

What has your experience been like as a black woman in film?

Regina Hoyles:

You know, you have a lot of, at times proving, it feels like to people who, who wouldn't do the same thing to a cis white man who is just, you know, and like, it's, you're aware as a black person, you're always kind of, at least for me, like you're kind of walking through life with a bit of a double consciousness, you know, I've been afforded opportunities where I've been in rooms where I'm like, oh, I know how to like navigate this in a way where I, I can just, I can be myself, but also like I have my guard up a little bit , um, and things are changing, but it, that depends on the room you're in. I feel like someone will say like, let's celebrate black woman and someone might shout back. No , all women in this like, no one was like coming for anybody else, you know? And it's just like, we've been celebrating everybody else for so long. And we've been told the narrative that like, we don't matter for so long. So why is it offensive to you that we can't uplift our own communities? You know? And I think that that is true. Like if we don't have our community, like, what do you have? Like, I feel like that's, that's truly important to me. So yeah. It's , it's to say, like, what's my experience as a black filmmaker, it puts me in a little bit of a head spin because I'm like, I don't know, I've been a black person, like my whole life. And so I'm like, I don't know that I necessarily am able to differentiate the two in ways, you know? And I've again, been fortunate enough where I have found community and a lot of other black people, like there are people out here doing it. And regardless of what you're hearing or seeing in terms of like, we can't find them, they , yes, they exist. They exist and they're doing great, even though they just haven't been given the opportunities because of like a lot of gatekeeping that has been long, long a part of our industry. So I , I think we're really getting to a place, a place of, okay, like let's call for accountability. Let's actually identify the specific communities. Even with the whole like BiPOC thing. I'm a little like hesitant to, to say that because that loop mumps in a whole group of like people of color and it's like, no, no, no. Let's point out the very specific differences that we can celebrate. Not saying like you're against any of these communities, but you're just wanting to recognize this is what makes you special. This is what makes you special, you know, like, let , let's give the same, the same , um, attention to detail to these communities as I feel like we haven't given to white folks for the longest. Um, so that's yeah,

Kat:

Definitely . Yeah. And you know, going off of that , um, something that stood out to me when I was doing a little bit of creeping on you , um, on your website, it says that, you know, your little mantra on , um , RLH productions, it said, you know, a black woman owned a boutique production company where we believe diversity to be normalcy, both onscreen and behind the scenes. And that really stuck with me. I was just like, yeah, that's a good point. Like why, like why, why, why isn't it normal?

Layne Marie:

Yeah. I mean , I feel like it's like one of those things where it's like, I hope that we can get to a place in the world where that doesn't have to be a part of your mission statement. I just have so much admiration for you. And I'm so excited to see what you do next. So speaking of which, what are you working on right now? And like, what are you working on like filmmaking, artistically, and then also like, what are you working on that has nothing to do with your career?

Regina Hoyles:

What am I working on that has nothing to do with my career ? I'll start there is myself.

All:

Hahahahaha!

Layne Marie:

Yes! I love it!

Regina Hoyles:

Um , self-work , you know, I've been in therapy , um , for a good minute. I'll literally be finishing up , um , this week. Um, but like just talking through some things about myself, you know, I feel like the pandemic gave a lot of, a lot of things, just the opportunity to rush the surface that need to be addressed to be healed , um, within me. So I think that this year has very much been a year of accountability for me being accountable for my thoughts, my emotions, recognizing that they don't have to be the master of me, but I'm the master of them. Um, I feel like that's, I'm in such a place of just like I'm open to whatever growth God is intending for me to step into. Um, and then on the career front, you know, I'm workshoping a couple of pilots. There's one that I really, really want to shoot as soon as possible, but I'm going to go back into the cave and hone it just a little bit more, but that, that's what I really want to get out there. Um , and then still on the acting tip, you know, like stay tuned for things there I'm very much, always very much honing that craft. Um, and so I'm, I'm open to very , a lot of collaboration opportunities. I think at this time, like I'm producing the feature version of a short called Tinder written and directed by Felicia pride that I produced shortly after Adullam. So in the end of 2019, and we're in like early, early pre-pro for that. And then I'm working with a lot of upcoming creatives who like have experiences as actors, but not necessarily behind the scenes experience . And so serving as a producer, just knowing that I have certain resources and knowledge that I'm able to share and all of them are black women. So I might just being able to like pour into people who look like me is really important and fulfilling for me at this time.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. Like as an actor, when you do step behind the camera and take on different roles, why do you, like, what do you think that has done for you as an actor? Like, do you feel like it's helped you? Do you feel like it's hurt you in some ways? A little bit of both .

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah. It definitely, definitely doesn't hurt me. And it helps me so much because when I'm just an actor on set , like I'm, I'm totally aware of what everybody else needs and the crew I'm like, I know that this will be helpful for scripty. I know that this will be helpful for the director. I know that the first AD just needs me to get out the trailer right now. Like what, what is really required of me as an actor. And I, like, I just do my best, honestly, like make everyones job easier while also making sure that I create that space for myself to do a good job as an actor. Um, so I think it's definitely gave me a deeper appreciation because let me tell, I have been humbled , um as a PA and I think that's a good place to operate from just imagining, like I could be a PA like next week on somebody else's shoot and I'm gonna go right back into it. I don't care what trailer out on came out of. I will still be running around, eating lasts for everybody else. You know, like just having that mentality makes it so much more easy to work with with others when I'm in that actor capacity. Cause I'm just like, I appreciate you. I know where you're coming from. I'm gonna let you do your thing cause I've been there before.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. Yeah. I love that. I agree. I think like, as an actor, like go produce something on your own. Uh , it does, it does give you like, you know, an idea of like what it's like behind the, on the other side. Very cool. Well, I, you know, I want to ask you as well. Like, do you have any advice for our listeners?

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah, I would definitely say be try as often as possible, as early, as often as possible to be your authentic self and don't be afraid to speak your truth, try your best. And I say your best because we're human. Like it happens. We sometimes don't even realize it's happening, but do your best to avoid shape-shifting to fit somebody else's idea of you or what shape-shifting to fill , fit somebody else's idea of what your career should look like. And, you know, please like understand we're all humans like you, what you might feel about yourself one day career-wise could totally be different like the next year. You know, I'm pretty sure that's been the experience for a lot of folks , um, in this pandemic that has forced a lot of people to pause and kind of reevaluate where they're at professionally, personally. So be gentle with yourself, give yourself a lot of grace, you know, it's okay to, to fall down and make mistakes as long as you're trying. And like again, being authentic, coming from an authentic place, I think that's truly what, what has made so many people successful is they were genuinely just being their self and thinking nothing of it, honestly. So yes, they true stay true. Stay you.

Kat:

Is that what you would say to younger Regina?

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah, I would. I think I have always been, I feel like there had always been that, u m, as an a ctor specifically, that one that just wondering of, do I just say yes, because like, this is an opportunity or do I like seek this person out because like, t hey're they have these accolades and this, this u nder like they're just big in the industry. I don't know. I feel like I was not totally understanding of the idea that people truly will come to you so long as you're just being yourself and doing the work that speaks to who you are as a person and as an artist. And sometimes the work for me is literally just showing up, just showing up as me. And so I think that I would tell myself that when I think of younger, i t's, it's funny. C ause I'm still y oung. I'm like, I feel like I, I definitely have grown so much just even since I was in college o f feeling like I needed to like reach out to as many people as possible. And I admire that in my younger s elf, the drive, but I feel like I c ould h ave focused that energy on honing, like what it is about me. I want to tell a s, as a storyteller, what kind of work do I want to make or be a part of that really speaks to things that people need to hear. U m, you know, whether it be an encouraging word through a film or something that has to do with like the black community, how do I showcase that? You know, just really honing in. I believe I did the best of what I could while also when you're younger, you don't necessarily have that much life experience to pour into your art. You know, like i t's, that's why you see a lot of like older people who are just truly killing it. And it's because they've lived, they've had so much to experience and now they have formed these very, u m, solid opinions about the world and about themselves. And so like, I think I would just continue to tell myself to give myself room to grow, u m, g ive myself more grace because I'm not g oing t o get it right. Even t ill like I'm doing this at 80 years old lord willing, you know, I think that's just really important.

Layne Marie:

Well, and I think that perspective is really interesting because it's like, you know, when you talk about like how you were sending emails and you were reaching out to all these people, when, you know, not that, that wasn't fruitful. Of course it was, but like looking at it and being like, man, I kind of wish I had just like slowed down and like taken the time to like just create and just write and just figure out who I was. And I, I really relate to that. Cause I feel like I did that too . You know, I felt like I'd spent a lot of time just being like launchpad, gotta do this, gotta do that. Like, you know, hanging my hat on every single way I could like create, you know, but create in a way that was about that. Honestly in a lot of ways was tied to like capitalism. You know, it was like a capitalist mindset. Like I , I am my work and if my work isn't going somewhere that I, what do I have? And Kat and I talked about that in our first step episode recently just like, you know, who are you when you're not working? And like, gosh, it's just , um, I've been reading this book, The War on Art and um , highly recommend it . And it's all about like resistance and how resistance is ultimately like the enemy of you being able to be your authentic self and to create and to write. It's a great book. And if you haven't checked it out, it's a really easy read. It's one of those books that you can just kind of pick up, read a couple of pages, put it down.

Kat:

Yeah. It's super easy to feel like you have to constantly be, go, go, go. And my therapist has told me, she's like, I noticed you're like an all or nothing person. You need to stop that because you're draining yourself. And I was like, okay, Diane , I'll try.

Layne Marie:

She likes built some hot tea on you.

Kat:

Right. I was like, oh, you're right. I am an all or nothing type person. But yeah. And it's just like you said, like capitalism, like makes us think like, oh you, if, like you said, if your work isn't going anywhere then like, is , is it even worth anything? But like, if your work will always be worth something, no matter how many awards it has, no matter how many film festivals it gets into, it's still valid. No matter what.

Regina Hoyles:

Yes. Oh my gosh. That

Layne Marie:

Makes me want to talk about film festivals a little bit Regina.

Regina Hoyles:

Oh I would love to.

Layne Marie:

So you would please tell us about your, because I know I can tell you that our listeners really want to hear about film festivals

Regina Hoyles:

For me, you know, Adullam. I really had, I had such a vision. I had such a plan. I was like, we're going to have a physical film festival run. We're going to have these Airbnbs. I'm going to have the crew come out. It's going to be fun. We're going to , we're going to get into this. We're gonna get into this. And God was like, haha! And so with the pandemic, like we have this major shift right. O f these virtual film festivals. And that was already like interesting to me. And I think we all, what was the first big one South by Southwest? And that just m arked everything. We were all just like, what is going to happen? And you know, I, as this being my first short film, I like counting on this to really m ake its rounds and everything. But what I didn't see at the time of things just unfolding was the blessing coming from it of just like being able to be a part of way more festivals than I probably w ould h ave been able to physically, but even still, let me talk about this, u m, this journey and desiring things so badly and you have to get to a place of like, okay, I don't need it. Film festivals for me are absolutely an avenue. They're an opportunity, but they are not the end all be all. And also every experience will be totally different based on your team, based on your film and based off the programming team and that community. And I think that there can be, for me, I'll speak for myself. There's so much focus. I feel like I placed on certain ones and really banking on them. Like just accepting Adullam. And when I received rejections and see right there, see how I said, how I received rejections versus the film was rejected.

Layne Marie:

Whoa, woah!

Regina Hoyles:

I think I talked about this with my theripist and she was like. Girl, separate it. Just like that, that easily we can get so caught up. A nd this is what I mean with a wards we can get so caught up in the accolades and t he, the ornaments of the Christmas tree that we forget to admire the tree for what it is.

Layne Marie:

Right.

Regina Hoyles:

And just really appreciate. Amen. Really appreciates the journey and this film in this huge undertaking, we've all collectively poured into. And at the same time, you're also missing the other communities that you may not have been so focused on that are pouring into you. Like we love you. It's not a matter of acceptance as much as we just like celebrate you. And the fact that you like accomplish this, you know, that's a big feat indie filmmakers, like shout out to all of y'all who are out here doing this independent thing. It is not easy. It's hard. Yes, very much so. And like between like juggling already coming off of juggling multiple hats on set. Now you're like this distributor, this marketer, like all of that, you're hoping for the project, but you know, you got to accept that what the best outcome is doesn't always have to look like what you envision it to be. And I feel like for me, I, one had to let go of the idea that rejections were not a reflection of myself as an artist. Um, it didn't mean I couldn't make art. And I had moments where I was like, maybe I just shouldn't be a filmmaker. Like maybe again, this is literally my first like short film. And I'm already saying like, I don't belong out there. Like, I'm just not like, meant to do all this only for like acceptances to come in that I didn't expect prize money that I didn't expect to come in. And all of these, like people who are rallying around me and my team that made me go like, wow , I never saw any of this. And I think it's when you let go of any expectation in life, it too , like you open yourself up for so many blessings and just roll on in that you never would have expected. And I feel like for me, the film festival journey absolutely taught me that even when it was virtual, I try to like reason with myself saying like, okay, things are virtual. It should be like easier to get them like this, this and this now, you know, like I thought that that would be helpful for , to the ones that I was like truly holding onto. But once I let go, once I allowed myself to explore other avenues of getting the film, like out there, it was like, wow , you know, like it's really not the end all be all. And I had to remind myself for the most part, I would be like the youngest in the lineup of like filmmakers for a category. And at times I had to really let these stories sink in of someone saying, you know, I've been trying to get into this festival like every year and I'm 40 something years old. And you know, like, I believe like Ava DuVernay always talks about like trying to get into Sundance in a variety of their programs and to being rejected multiple times. And it's like, why is it that we're so prone to focus on the nose that when the yeses come, we're just like, okay, cool. Or we celebrate. And like, it was like, all right, next, next, next.

Layne Marie:

Right. Right. It's like this complex of like never enough, never an I mean, I definitely experienced that. Like, and it's something that I've, I've been working really hard on and I, I totally feel you about the pandemic as difficult and horrible as it has been, you know, the silver linings are there. And I think a lot of that has just been like slowing down really prioritizing what's important, working on self-care , which is, would be like our next question. How do you, like, what are some self-care rituals that you have? Like what, like, what do you do to have like a work-life because again, like we've discovered in this podcast today, it is so easy to just go, go, go, go. I'm a machine. I'm only as good as my next thing. Like money, money, money, money, money, like, how do you, what do you do?

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah . For people who are offer this to anyone who has adapted that thinking of like, you are a machine we are, and some would have, may have heard it, but you are a human being, not a human doing. I believe that it is really important to rest in that and just accept like where you are at any time in life. And for me, self-care , I also really love Layne Marie , how you said ritual, because I think that we, a lot of times use self care as a quick band-aid to a cut, we just got versus like us just taking in , um, taking in a lot of things that are healthy for us and letting that just be our baseline versus our emergency. So for me, it's been like getting better with being disciplined and it, and that in itself is like an uphill battle, trying to make sure I'm like on it. I also offer , um , to people to take deep breaths because that's something I incur , I'm noticing I'm incorporating more, so much of our , our problems come from us, like holding our breath. And like, you don't realize how much we're just walking around life up here, like in our chest, you know, just gosh , like you can feel life returned back into you. Um , so recognizing when I'm holding that in my shoulders, like your body, your body doesn't lie. That's one of the first things I was taught , um, in acting is like, the body does not lie. So checking in with myself, mentally checking in with myself physically. Um, I'm not a hiker, I'm not a camper, but I love nature. And that it makes me feel so grounded and connected. So when I'm home, you know, I got a big backyard. I like to walk around barefoot in the grass. I love to like take super deep breaths and open spaces. I love traveling places that are rich in nature. I just got back home a couple of weeks ago from Eugene, Oregon, and just being in a new place that I've never been before, where there's so much beauty just in the earth and taking that in. Like that does make me feel so like alive, you know, like it's really, it's really how I restart and just make. And also, I, you know, I, I'm very known amongst my friend groups for disappearing, from social media, without any warning whatsoever. Um, and just like going off the grid.

Layne Marie:

Hiatus time. See ya later!

Regina Hoyles:

Yup, that's me.

Layne Marie:

It's like, yeah, whatever. Like it's just , sometimes it's just good to take a hiatus. Like just delete the apps, just get off for a minute.

Kat:

Yeah. Just get off your screen for however long.

Regina Hoyles:

Yeah! And I don't start my morning. I don't start my morning with my phone. Like I have it on do not disturb, put it on airplane mode off . All I got is The Bible app. And I'm reading scriptures in the morning, but that's it like, other than that, making sure that, you know, my thoughts at the top of my day are my thoughts. Like , and I know self , like I'm bringing into therapy, things that I didn't even ever considered before about myself. I'm like, wait a minute. Was that, was that just somebody else saying that? And I'm like, oh, maybe that's me. Maybe that's how I should live my life. Like, I think that we're in such a like consumer , uh , consumer , um, period right now where we're just taking in we're scrolling. We don't even realize how much we're allowing everybody. And they mama to pour into us so much so that we don't even know, like we can't even find ourselves because it was like, oh, I am, I'm adopting that thinking. I'm adopting that thinking. Yeah .

Layne Marie:

Yeah , absolutely. Oh, it's so

Kat:

Easy to get wrapped up in that. And like what I really liked that , of all the wonderful things you listed was that the way you talk to God, isn't all like whole, like completely wholesome prayer. Cause like I came from a really religious family and like, I've been trying to kind of figure out where I stand with certain things. But like I like how like genuine. And really you are by saying like, God, I'm kind of right now. Like that's I love that. And like it's , it's, it makes religion less intimidating, less scary. Cause I know some people struggle with that. So I really liked that at that time. I'm gonna start my mornings now.

Layne Marie:

Yeah. Oh, that's so wonderful. You're such a magical person, you know, like you're just someone that like you, I could spend, I could literally talk to you like all day and it's just, it's such a beautiful thing. And I, one thing I also want to ask because we've talked, we've covered a lot of ground and this is such a simple question, but I feel like it's so important. What do you, what do you do for fun?

Regina Hoyles:

What do I do for fun?

Layne Marie:

How do you have fun?

Regina Hoyles:

What do I do? I travel. I engage in my bougie tendencies. Uh , I love being bougie. I love it. Uh, I,

Layne Marie:

I want to hear more about that. You're going to have to unpack that. How do you be bougie?

Regina Hoyles:

I treat myself to the finer things You know that hotels are we five star hotel? We treat ourselves essentially a water, you know, no offense to those who are drinking from like a Walgreens brand. That's okay, too. If that's your bougie, then that's your bougie . That's fine. And like, for me, I'm just like taking , putting more effort into what I put into my body. Sometimes I'll go, I'll go for the whole foods salad instead of , um, some other random grocery around the corner. Other things I do for fun. I feel like talking to my girlfriends is truly a church in some ways. I love talking to them, especially, and I love all of my friends who are in the industry too, but I have some people who are from home who are not in this industry. And just being able to like unravel with them being like, girl, did you hear about like this person from our high school? I was like, oh my gosh.

Kat:

Ugh yes! yes! Oh, it's so fun to talk about other things!

Speaker 1:

It is! It is! And it reminds you, we were like, oh right. I'm a human. Okay, cool. Cool . Just to check in that way. So, oh, it's not as much for fun. It is intentional, but like I do get joy from it. I, my desire is to become incredibly, incredibly fluent in Spanish. Like totally fluent I, I hear yes. And I I've learned, I've been taught Spanish my whole life. I wasn't like AP Spanish, got a five on that test. Shout out to me and I'm able to have like conversational Spanish, like when I'm in public, but I want to be like in Barcelona, Spain able to like go and just like, people don't doubt me, you know? And now nowadays, like people will look and be like, oh , can we trust you? I do really know what we're speaking. But yeah, that's my goal. I always, when I'm around like native speakers and I hear them flow in and out, I'm like, I want to be like that so bad. Like I just , and it's such a beautiful language. That's something I want to do.

Layne Marie:

Yeah!

Kat:

That's so inspiring.

Layne Marie:

I love that. And I feel like you will absolutely make that happen.

Regina Hoyles:

Thank you . Thank you . I received that. Yeah . Yeah.

Kat:

One day she is going to pick up the phone and just start like a mile a minute. It'd be like,

Layne Marie:

I'd be like, I understood approximately three words of that.

Kat:

Yeah right!

Regina Hoyles:

Make these sets even more inclusive!

Layne Marie:

Yeah. Got you. You know, well, Regina, you know, where can we follow and support you? Where can our listeners go look you up and like, see, you know, your next TV show. Like tell us, tell us where we can go to, to keep an eye on you.

Kat:

Where do we find Regina?

Regina Hoyles:

Yes! For sure. Well , you know, Instagram is pretty much my only social media. Um , I'm at Regina Hoyles R E G I N A H O Y L E S. Um, and then my website is the same reginahoyls .com . Like , if you want to look me up, literally just look up my name. Cause I don't have any like, you know, QT girl, 21. I don't have any like code names . Like just look me up there. And then my production company's Instagram is at RLHprod, P R O D. And then that's the same for the website is www.RLHprod.com. And that's pretty much how you can stay in touch with me also for those who like to do, you know, connects professionally in the DMS . I might on occasion, but do keep in mind that I really, really do like go missing off social media sometimes. Um, and I really love, I love emails. I stay in my emails. I think that's my favorite mode of communication. Um, so Yeah, that's um , that's me!

Kat:

And we'll add all of those in the show notes so people can find ya .

Layne Marie:

Yeah and go follow you and check out what you're up to next!

Kat:

And email you.

Layne Marie:

I love it. Time to go off Walkie! Thank you so much to Regina for being our very first guest here! And thank you to our listeners. We hope you learned a thing or two and are inspired to get creative until next time. I just would like to take a special moment to thank our executive producers of noisefloor LTD. If you're not familiar with noisefloor, or you should become familiar with noisefloor, you can check out their website. They are a post sound production house. They also have fabulous location mixers, really any kind of sound service you need for making videos. This is the place to go.

Kat:

Also, thank you, thank you. Thank you to my very good friend Brynn Wassel for giving us our lovely logo. I can't wait to see it as an actual neon sign one day!

Layne Marie:

It's so cute. Oh yeah, we got grand plans. Y'all so definitely stay tuned. Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Instagram at the walkie check and at legacy Marie pictures.

Intro
Making Indie Films
The Actor Side Of Things
How To Get Industry Representation
Connections and Genuine Friendships
Regina's Amazing Acting Resume
How's LA Life?!
Challenges As A Creative Person
What Have You Been Binge Watching?
Being A Black Woman In Film
What Is Regina Working On Next?
Taking On Different Roles
Film Festivals
Self Care
What Regina Does For Fun!
Thanks, Regina!