The Walkie Check- A holistic talk with creatives

Go for Victoria Salazar

February 01, 2022 Layne Marie Williams Season 1 Episode 5
The Walkie Check- A holistic talk with creatives
Go for Victoria Salazar
Show Notes Transcript

Take a listen to this episode where I chat with Victoria Salazar a sound editor at Noisefloor LTD in Chicago where she works on a large variety of films, games, tv, commercials and podcasts. (like this one ;)

Join us as we learn more about the post production audio world and what that process entails.

Host: Layne Marie Williams

Films Mentioned:
Blanche (Short)

Show Sponsors:
On Set Headsets
On Set Headsets are made of military-grade specs so that they can take on whatever the SPFX department throws at them. Whether it’s inside or outside the studio environment, our products remain durable.

Camera Ambassador
a one-stop-shop, carrying everything from cameras and lenses to grip trucks and production supplies. Their equipment roster includes high-end brands such as Arri, Red, Canon, Cooke, Zeiss, O’Connor, Small HD, Teradek, and more. They’ve also got you covered with specialty items such as anamorphic lenses, gimbals, and grip trucks.  Learn more about Camera Ambasaddor at www.cameraambassador.com 


Graphics/Logo: Brynne Wassel
Music By: Devin Delaney & Noisefloor LTD

On Set Headsets
Surveillance Headsets that are perfect for active film work.

Camera Ambassador - Rental House in Chic
a one-stop-shop, carrying everything from cameras and lenses to grip trucks and production supplies.

Speaker 1:

Hello, and welcome to the walkie check. Hey folks. Welcome to the walkie check I'm lane . Murray Williams, a film director in Los Angeles, California. We're so super excited to be working with our friends at noise floor to bring you the most creative and talented people out there to share their experiences, knowledge, and power. Victoria's a sound editor at noise floor L T D . She started noise floor's custom sound effects department, where she has been cultivating and curating one of a kind sound libraries for noise floor and its, and tell along with creating sound effects. Game audio has been a driving passion in her life. She excels working with game developers and collaborating with other disciplines to make the best interactive experience for the player. While working as a sound editor or mixer, she believes understanding how sound can evoke emotions and others is something that is truly an important in her work. The walk you check is sponsored by onset headsets. The standard of headset in Hollywood made with Kevlar reinforced wiring and water resistant microphone with one year warranty on all products, get your headset and different styles and colors, including the camo and elite series available at film pools in all panel vision shops, order online@onsetheadsets.com. Today we are joined with the wonderful, the lovely the electric Victoria Salazar.

Speaker 2:

Go for Victoria Salazar.

Speaker 1:

Hello and welcome to the walk check today. We are here with the fabulous Victoria Salazar . Hello? Hello. Hey Victoria. What's up so glad to have you here this morning. Thank

Speaker 2:

You for having me.

Speaker 1:

We're here to talk a little bit about Victoria and all the amazing things she does in the post sound world. Victoria, why don't you start by just telling us a little bit of about yourself, where you're from, what you do.

Speaker 2:

I'm from the suburbs of Chicago. My family lives out here, so , um, I've just kinda like stuck around and I went to school in Chicago as well. Uh , I went to Tribeca flashpoint, which is now actually closing. I learned it's a little sad cuz there are some good people that came out from there. Yeah , it's sad. Um, but yeah, I went to flashpoint and , and I studied recording arts and I got an internship at a studio called noise floor LTD in Chicago. Hey bye bye . And <laugh> and it , um , kind of morphed into me , um , getting contracted for a bit and kind of renewing that contract for a while to help out on, on some features that they were doing. I was like cutting backgrounds and just helping out where I could. And then , um, luckily I got hired on as staff in 2018. I believe so.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that was when we met it's 2018. Yeah,

Speaker 2:

I think we met like that summer.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, because it was through Scotland. Yes.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Yeah. So that was like my first bigger location job as well. <laugh>

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I remember meeting Katie waters and saying, you know, I'd really like a fem identifying sound operator yeah . To work on set and you know, like, do you , do you have a woman sound op ? And um, she was like, we do. And so it was very exciting to get to work with you that first time. And then, you know, of course then I fell in love with you and <laugh> , you know, I was checking out your, I M D B earlier. You've got like a lot of credits, a lot of credits. Yeah. Everything ranging from like sound designer to sound editor fully . I mean the list goes on and I'd love to just hear more about your, your side of the industry. What about it really fills you up with joy and makes you wanna do what you do? I think

Speaker 2:

Like the main thing for me is I want to evoke emotion in people and um, like a great way of doing that is through like sound design, like mixing a film, you can kind of like make people feel like a certain way based on just sound and like it is totally based on story. And the, the director, the filmmaker, the storyteller sound , um, helps like evoke Mo emotion in people. Like you can help immerse person immerse people into a story a lot better. And it's kind of a, a fun, challenging way to kind of like put people in a certain place and time in a film. Like you can totally do it based on visual, but sound definitely helps because like, if it's a Western, you're not gonna hear like a train passing by like a modern train or like airplanes, you know? So it's kind of, it's fun to kind of create that environment and like create at like story based on sound as far as

Speaker 1:

The different positions that you've taken on in the post sound world. What's your favorite and what are your goals long term ? Cause I know you and I have talked a little bit about, you're such an incredible sound designer and it seems like that's the place where you like really shine you. Yeah. Like

Speaker 2:

That's definitely one of the fun things . Like it , that's a , it's a privilege to be able to do sound design on a lot of jobs cuz you know, when you start out doing sound like you're kind of just like editing backgrounds and like not very like that is like detail oriented and like fun at times, but it's not like the, you know, it's not like creative. I would say like sound design is probably something that I enjoy most out of like doing sound, but dialogue editing is actually quite fun and it's, and it's weird fun cuz you're like, what you have is what you have in the edit. And like, yes, you can do some ADR, but most of what's there is like you , you have to try to use it. So the challenge of getting a super noisy piece of like production audio and like cleaning that up and kind of making it sound better is super rewarding. And um, it's, it's also very fun to do and challenging.

Speaker 1:

I have like a , a pretty strong understanding of like the post sound process because I've done it a number of times now. And I'm also, you know, good friends with the folks at no floor . Yeah . So , but like man, some of it just goes like truly beyond me, you know, like you really have to be like a scientist studying the sound and you know, I mean there's just so much that goes into it. It's

Speaker 2:

Definitely good for filmmakers to like at least try to go through the process a couple times to just get a better understanding of what goes into like post-production sound. But it, again, like I learn new things every single day. It's hard to explain to people, not in sound kind of like what you're doing and all of that stuff. And it's kind of fun cuz you're just like trying to explain to them and sometimes they're just like, don't get it <laugh> which is totally fine. <laugh> yeah. It's, it's definitely a very like niche in the filmmaking community. What does your

Speaker 1:

Process within that usually look like particularly when you're sound designing,

Speaker 2:

I'll watch it and then try to get the story without hearing like the director kind of explain anything to me, you know, just try to understand the story from my point of view , but for like anyone kind of explains it to me and then , um , we'll have a spotting session with the creative, get a feel of like what you want the audience to feel during certain moments of the film. Um, like Sutley was a really good example of like using some unique sound design because you wanted it to be very magical musical yet like still real. So that like that was a cha Ellen , cuz you didn't want it to be like all these different OS coming outta nowhere, you know? Or like you're just randomly hearing like wind chimes for no reason. Like there's like a reason for use of sound. So that's um, a very fun way to like kind of get the story out of the director is like, okay, how can we make this scene a little different using sound design? Um, how do you want that? Like the audience to feel when, when they watch this part of the film. So we'll do that. We'll do the spotting session and then , um, we'll kind of go based on like what type of things you wanna like the audience to feel and like what you wanna hear if we're using like backgrounds for sound design, like you wanna hear cicadas be super loud for that moment. Like we can kind of use that to help, you know, with the sound on sound process and for

Speaker 1:

Our listeners that perhaps are unfamiliar with, you know, the phrase sound spotting spotting session. Could you , could you break that down?

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So a spotting session is basically we'll watch the film together with the creatives, the filmmakers just basically get all of their hopes and dreams. Like what do you want this sound like, you know, if they're in a car, what do you want the car to sound like? Do you want it to sound like more aggressive, like a muscle car or do you want it to sound like more tame? And obviously it , it needs to be grounded with what people see, but you know, there , you can kind of tweak that with sound. So , um, it's basically you go through the whole film and get the filmmakers dreams with sound in that session. And then from there, like as a sound designer, sound editor, we know, we know kind of like what people, what you wanna hear in specific moments of the film and anything to help with like storytelling. So like if there's something that's happening in, in black, so you wanna hear like that something happening in the background of something, but it's just like a black screen. We can kind of, you know, do that using sound. I know

Speaker 1:

Like when we work together, like we'd often talk about a lot of different references and you know, inspiration from other resources and you know, talk about feeling or mood or color. I mean, there's so many different ways. I feel like you can like collaborate on creating like the soundscape or score of your project.

Speaker 2:

It's very interesting because it is based off of realism of like where, where the story is taking place. Like what time of day it is and like what's happening in the story. But after you get through all of that, you can kind of like go off on little creative adventures, you know, and find something that works , um , for the story.

Speaker 1:

That's so fun. Ugh . I wanna hear more about all of that. What's been like your favorite project

Speaker 2:

So far. Oh man. There's so many like sound design wise , honestly. Okay. So, so we, we were recently worked on this short film together and like at first I was like, oh, this will be like, chill. It'll be fine. I didn't think there was going to be that much like sound design in it, but blanche

Speaker 1:

For which one? Oh B blanch . Yeah. So

Speaker 2:

Like that was honestly very fun to work on. It was like challenging in a sense where like, you know, she's schizophrenic and like very not herself and like is very crazy. So trying to create like a sounds scape for that was challenging. Um, especially with like layering a , a bunch of different voices together. Um, that was definitely a challenge cuz you wanted to hear some of it, but then you wanted it to also just be like overwhelming and like very noisy, I guess, in a good way. So that was very fun and challenging.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, absolutely. So blanch is a short film written by Alexandra Martin also stars Alexandra Martin, Victoria was a sound operator, sound designer , uh , noise floor did a lot of the post. Did all the post sound on that project , um , shop by Olivia Aqualina, gaffer , Paige Hawk. Statter lots of, lots of great folks that helped bring that LA film to life that actually lived in Chicago previously. Yeah . So, so that's, that's a fun one and you know, we're definitely in the midst of gearing up for the film festival circuit with it . I know Alec has been hitting the page , met hard, just kind of seeing how the film does in the circuit and you know, eventually we'll we'll end up online, but that, that is definitely like work that we've done together so far that I've loved so much , um ,

Speaker 2:

Was really fun . Like the process was really fun and like Devon , our music composer worked on it as well. So like working with him and like to trying to figure out like where he could help me sound design wise and where I could help him with sound design , um, for music was very like, I would say the bathtub when she was in the bathtub. That's my favorite, my favorite part, cuz like my sound design was just lining up so well, I was like, oh wow. And like, it just meshed very well together. Um , so that it was very fun working with him on that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. What does that look like? Like if I were a fly on the wall, how would I catch you in your process? Like would say a composer like Devon like paint the scene for me. Is there like coffee? Are you like hitting vape pens? Like what's the vibe <laugh> so

Speaker 2:

It's normally, it's normally like he chats me, Hey, do you have a sec to talk about this? And it's like, give me 10 minutes and then I'll go into like whatever room he's in. And he'll like have a basic like draft usually or like, you know, a set of instruments like already kind of roughly in place and he'll play it. And then we'll kind of, I talk about like our spotting sessions, cuz like we do separate spotting sessions with the director cuz at one strictly like based on music and then the other is, you know, everything else sounds so like dialogue, ADR, anything else mixing? I

Speaker 1:

Think also like any director worth their salt, they're gonna make certain that their communications with both department heads , uh , and collaborators is going to, you know, right. So that's something to definitely be cognizant of. Yeah. And

Speaker 2:

I would say it's super, it's pretty easy for us because I could just literally like walk into Devon's room and like we can just talk about something. If I'm stuck on a certain spot, I can see what he's doing and um, like take the at and like kind of con like frequency content is he using to make it feel a certain way. I can kind of take that and like go back to my sound design and adjust kind of sound design something based off of that. So yeah, I'll go into his room and we'll kind of like, he'll show me roughly what he's got like laid out or like I will show him roughly what I have laid out depending on like who got there first kind of is like how it's been far . Um , and then we'll just kind of like talk about the scene, talk about our spotting sessions for blanche . We did that quite a bit, cuz it was like, he's like I'm trying not to write Wawa music, but there's certain spots where like I need to have music. He wanted to have space for sound design as well. So it wasn't all music. So like that was very fun to kind of like work with him and try to like get the right band .

Speaker 1:

I'm very excited for people to see y'all's work in that one because it is, it , it just took the project to a whole other nother level. And I think that's, that's the true power of, of post-production is you get to get back into war , um , assembling your weapons to be even strong longer than they were when you first started using them. You know,

Speaker 2:

At least from my point of view, like post is where you can, you can kind of change the story if you really wanted to like based on based off of all of that. So it's very fun. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I mean, you know, like there's just, there's so many different like routes and paths, ways you could go. I mean, you know, if you put a beeping horn over a shot of a bird crossing the street, that's gonna be a totally different vibe than if a symphony was playing as a bird cross the street, you know? Right,

Speaker 2:

Right. <laugh> so it's very fun how you can like change the story and the feel of a film based off of like, like a simple thing as like a bird. Yeah. <laugh> yeah.

Speaker 1:

I mean it's such a sensory. I think that's the beautiful thing about filmmaking is it is very sensory focused, particularly if there's an interdisciplinary element, you know, if there's like performance and you know, let's say smell involved. I mean, and then also visuals, I mean , now, now we're talking

Speaker 2:

<laugh> now it's different <laugh> yeah. But it , it , it's so fun that you can like, it's so fun to work with other people in that sense where you're just like, okay, our goal is to make the audience feel like a certain way. Having all of those elements work together for the film is, is like truly like magical. Like that's the thing where you're like, oh my God, it worked, you know

Speaker 1:

<laugh> yeah. I mean, that's, that's the, the , the power of an ensemble too, I would say. Yeah , because it's like all of these different pieces come together to create this one thing. Yeah . Um , but when we all need one of another in order to be able to execute it, so it's, it's a very special medium it's it's exhausting. Speaking of exhaustion,

Speaker 2:

How do you ,

Speaker 1:

It's very exhausting. How do you like balance? Cause you are, you are someone that is like always hustling. You're always working on like a million projects at once. I'm lucky to get to be one of those people that you're constantly working with. How do you like maintain like your health, your focus , how do you continuously like refill your cup so that you can show up and slay all day?

Speaker 2:

<laugh> well, I love working with you too. Of things . It's always fun. Um, I'm, I'm kind of like, I feel like I'm a , I'm struggling with that a little bit right now. I feel , um, with the pandemic and everything it's , it's been hard to kind of slow down mm-hmm <affirmative> or just kind of like turn off for a minute and like, luckily we've been, we've been pretty busy, which, which I'm so thankful for, but it's, it's a little hard. So, so far I've learned into that. I really like running, like who would've thought. Yeah . Yeah . But running has been like a really good, it really does turn off my, like my sound mind , I guess, where I can just like focus on breathing and like that's all I focus on. Um, and I'm trying to read more. <laugh> just trying to read more, hang out with my family a lot more because like, I feel like , um, I kind of like , wouldn't hang out with them cuz I was focusing on work and I was like, I should, I should focus on like I should have a balance. Yeah. It's mainly like just trying to get exercise, trying to get moving. I feel like my new mantra is like stop taking life so seriously. It's okay. It's okay. Take a breath. You know, you're good. It's not the end of the world, you know? Right.

Speaker 1:

We're just making films, you know, we're

Speaker 2:

Just exactly like it's not, it's not that big of a deal. Right ? Like it is a big, big deal, but you know, right. The stakes are , there's a balance to it. Like they ,

Speaker 1:

Right. It's like, you know, we can acknowledge that the , the stakes are high. And then also remember that we're not going to perform surgery every day , heart surgery. Right. You know? Yeah . We're just trying to make people feel things with said heart , you know exactly, exactly. We gotta enjoy ourselves in order to ensure that they enjoy theirselves themselves. Um , but I,

Speaker 2:

Yeah , it's been a bit of a challenge, but I feel like the more I like focus on okay. Just take a step back or like just keep reminding myself, Hey, it's okay to make mistakes. You know, you don't have to be perfect all the time.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. When filmmakers come to you with the post process , like knowing that they wanna hire noise floor , what would be some advice that you would give them to prepare them ahead of time? Like you could see more like what do they need to come in with

Speaker 2:

Kind of knowing what the story is like, what you want out of sound. Especially if it's like specific would be

Speaker 1:

Very helpful. And my process I've started, you know, I have Google, Google folders for all the things semi Google drive. And one of the folders that I create for all of my projects is post-production and that's the place where you can start accumulating. You know, I know that I want to play with the idea that insects are going to be part of the scary quality of this horror movie I'm writing, you know, like that's something that I'll, I'll make a note of so that when you and I are talking about sound yeah . Down the road for this feature I've been writing for like three years, then I can point to that. I can share it with you and say like, Hey, this is what I've been like collecting over time. Um, and you're just kind of like getting ahead, you know, getting ahead, like thinking about how , what do you want your film to sound like

Speaker 2:

Knowing those things. Like, I definitely wanna hear like at summertime and cicadas are out , I definitely wanna hear cicadas, you know? And like, if you don't hear that in the production audio, or like if that wasn't added in like the edit for like for scratch you, you know, to just as a placeholder , um, it's really good to know those things, especially for sound design, like in a specific scene, like how do you want people to feel during this scene when they're watching it? One thing I

Speaker 1:

Wanted to talk about today too, was the general disparity of women, gender nonconforming and trans folks, and postproduction sound. And I wanted to ask what can people like me do to continue to encourage that? And what can, what , what can we, what can we do <laugh> to fix that

Speaker 2:

Disparity? Well, if, if the people aren't there now, I guess, so it's more about like the younger kids, like growing up and kind of like, not knowing that this is an option when I was in high school, like, I didn't know, I could do this for a job. Like I was like, I need to be a nurse. I need, you know, like it didn't occur to me that I could do something like this. And to be honest, I just like kind of fell into it. Luckily like I love it, don't get me wrong, but like, it just kind of happened. Um, and I, I , and I wasn't like forcing myself to do like specific things. You know, if the people aren't there now, it's more about like educating the younger kids, like, Hey, you know, you can , you can help make movies and it doesn't, you don't have to be a star or like a camera person, like you can help on other ends of it, you know? Yeah. So

Speaker 1:

It sounds like, you know, providing more educational workshops resources,

Speaker 2:

Right? Like, like think of like TikTok , how many like fully videos there are, there are out there where like, people are like, oh, I love fo . And it's like to be honest, sometimes they don't know what fo is. So you're just like, okay, well actually that's not fully , this is fo like you have to kind of like educate them. But at the same time, it's like teaching people like how cool it could be or like, you know, how something in their favorite film was actually not done as you see it. It was actually something completely different that made the sound that's exciting to people. So like kind of getting that out to like the younger generation probably would be like a good start.

Speaker 1:

Give us some examples of bizaro Foley that you've implemented in the , in the past

Speaker 2:

BAAR Foley <laugh> for this , uh, this , uh , project we're working on. Um, I had to like re I , well, I was trying to recreate the sound of something that's in a TV show. Um , and it's not a TV show. It's it's for a game. And I was just like, I have no idea, like what this , it sounds like, like, to me it sounded like something squishy or like water, like, like water dripping onto like a plate or something like that. And I tried it multiple times did not work. I was actually like talking to like Brian and Jamie, cause I was like, I don't know what it is. And I was like, showing them examples of it. And Brian just went like this. Who's like <laugh>. And I was just like, that's amazing. And it's like, for like this slug thing crawling across the screen, like who would've thought that like your mouth could make that sound, you know? Yeah . I love that. That's what's super exciting to me is where you're just kind of like, you can't find it any, any sound library and it's not something normal that you would like kind of go for, but it's very fun. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

The art will fully everyone. Yeah. Do you wanna describe maybe? Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So, so it wa uh , it was kind of fully, but it was more just to like add as a sound effects, layer into something. Um , but basically I just like took my cheek and hit it against my teeth. So it's very interesting. Yeah . Very weird. But you know, sometimes sound is, is something where you can just like, kind of play with and have fun and just kind of , I don't know what's gonna happen if I hit this against this and hear how it sound , you know ? Yeah. So , and that's , that's a fun part. Are your ears just

Speaker 1:

Like perpetually, like, you're just like, you hear everything constantly. Like what what's

Speaker 2:

That? Like? I turn it off sometimes when I'm at work, like, I , I try very hard to like critical listen and like always be mindful of the frequency content of something, or like how that thing sounds in the space in a space . Um, but yeah, when I'm like outside, it just depends. Like sometimes I'll put music in just so I don't hear anything, you know, like you're like, I don't wanna, I don't wanna like focus on this weird stuff. I'm just gonna like, listen to you or like listen to a podcast. Yeah. I just try to turn it off. <laugh> when I'm not trying to like sound design or anything.

Speaker 1:

Yep . You know, that , that goes hand in hand with what we were discussing earlier about that like life balance, you know, work life balance as our good friend, Angie Gaffney often, you know, talks about as a subject. What are some other ways that you don't focus on work? What do you like to do for fun? How do you, again, how do you fill that cup back up? Oh , we talked about family life a little bit.

Speaker 2:

Yes. It it's really all the same stuff. I'm just trying to like do more outside of sound. Yeah . Running, going on walks. Um, I really wanna adopt a dog, but that probably won't happen soonish, which is fine. Um, I hang out with my cat cause I have a cat , his name's Paco . Super cute. <laugh> um , and yeah, hang out with my family and kind of like, hang out with friends too.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, absolutely. Cuz it , you know, turns out we aren't all machines. We aren't capitalists machines that constantly to beat and it's, I feel like it takes time, especially as like a filmmaker, entrepreneur artist type to recognize that like, oh, you know, actually if my life isn't being enriched, then my art necessarily isn't always going to flourish. Like you have to like constantly that's become very important to me over the years. Cause there was definitely a time where I just, I, I , I would ask myself like, who am I when I'm not working? And I didn't really know for a bit. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

And that's something I'm, I'm learning now finding yourself and like knowing who you are as a person. I am learning that right now. Like as we speak <laugh> so it's, it's very, very fun . It's like challenging and like very weird to like be in this part of my life I guess. But it's very fun. <laugh>

Speaker 1:

And you , uh , so you are the sound designer as well for the walkie check . Yes. Yeah. What's that ? What's that been like so far? I mean, you know, from commercials to films, to video games, to podcasting, I mean you really do it all and noise floor really does it

Speaker 2:

All. Yeah, yeah, yeah. It's really, it's really like noise. Floor's like, Hey, we have this job. It's like, I can help, you know, like let me help with it. <laugh> yeah. Um, but yeah, no it's super fun. Yes. Yeah, for sure. And like, I feel like that's the very fun, challenging thing about noise floor is the opportunity is definitely there. Do you wanna do this? Like, okay, you have time for it. Great. Do it, take it and run, you know, it's one of those things. Um, and it's very fond and challenging cuz you're like learning on the you're learning on the spot. You're kind of like figuring out what's the best way to do something. Even though, you know, sometimes there is no best way to do it. It's definitely like using different parts of your brain too, because like some of it is mainly all creative and some of it is like very technical and precise, but yeah, it's been very fun being a sound editor and sound designing for the walkie check . And like, I feel like I'm learning a lot from the filmmakers as well. Um, Regina, how she was like, I actually got the book, the Alchemist and that's the book I'm reading right now. <laugh> um , but it it's one of those things where you're just like, you're learning how other filmmakers are kind of living their life and trying to make art and like live and do all this stuff and I'm trying to do the same thing. So it's very fun listening to other people's point of view. Yeah. I tell you

Speaker 1:

What, there's a part of me that, and starting the a wa the walkie check, I feel spoil rotten a little bit because I get to just like, hang out and talk to people about what they do, why they do it, why they keep doing it and also, you know, distinguishing how they just live their lives as humans. And it's just super, it's been super fun so far and, you know, always a treat to get to hang out with you. And, and, you know, I think sometimes like pulling back the curtain on the wizard of Oz quality that does certainly take place with people behind the booth or behind the camera and, and also, you know, sound operators and sound designers. I feel like there's not really a lot of like publicity or press or opportunities for those people to get to pull back the curtain.

Speaker 2:

Sometimes it's just something people don't really care or like, think about. So it's very, it's kind of fun, like talking to people about it, cuz they're just like, oh, I would've never thought of that. Like, you know, having someone dialogue at it is just like what <laugh> like , this is such a crucial right . Part of the filmmaking process sound is very important and it helps like tell the story and immerse people into that world you're trying to create. So it's, it's, it's very fun kind of talking to people about it, for sure.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. And I think, you know, as a filmmaker, whether you're, you know, the director to the producer, to the production assistant, you learn by doing and so much of it is about practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice. I feel like I'm at a point now when we're in post together and I get sent over, you know, like the remote software of score

Speaker 2:

So far. Oh, like the revealing for it, the

Speaker 1:

Yeah , yeah . Yes , exactly. And I've gotten to where now I can be like, oh , I can hear that fridge. Oh , I can still hear that fridge. Um, we gotta take that out. You know, like I'm able to like detect things that I, I probably couldn't have even registered that I was hearing when I first started filmmaking, you know? Yeah. You, you just, you start to develop an ear and that that's really helpful. I feel like when it comes to communicating with people in your department, because , um, you know, you're kind of like thinking five steps ahead already before we've even had a meeting, you know, and you've E you've probably seen the film at this point, but I'm already kind of like catching that, like this particular scene is really noisy. It was really noisy that day, you know?

Speaker 2:

Right. Yeah. Yeah. And it's definitely something I feel like if you're not like consciously thinking about it, trying really hard to think about it, especially if you , if you're not focusing on sound or like a specific thing every single day, just like isn't second nature to you. So it just kind of like blows past you once people are like , in that mindset, like with you, like kind of like, okay, I'm gonna do a sound spotting session. Like I'm gonna watch the film again and listen who it front , like with sound in mind, you know, and kind of , um , have that conversation with someone else is , is helpful. I think so

Speaker 1:

It's just exciting, you know, it's so fun to, to get, to see the work that you've done so far. You've, you've your picture locked at this point. Yep . Um, and now you're in a place where you're able to do the, all the whole other editing process aspect of it, because it is a very, like, that's one thing that I feel like a lot of people that aren't, that don't make films from start to finish don't necessarily , uh , have the knowledge of, which is, it is a multi-step process. It takes time.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. It's not like you can do video editing and sound editing at the same time. Like that's not the case. Um, yeah. So it is very difficult. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Like, unless you're one man banding it and you're editing it and you're doing sound design at the same time, which a lot of people do . I mean, I've , I've done that as well. It's it's, you know, the beauty of involving all these other moving parts is that it has to get PA the Baton has to get past at the right time. What are you currently binging

Speaker 2:

Binging. Uh , so I'm watching white Lotus , not really binging it. I'm kinda like watching it as it comes out. Um, but it's so weird, but so good. Have you watched it?

Speaker 1:

I haven't. I saw something it's the internet must know that it should get on my radar cuz I saw something about it today and I was just like, Ooh , that looks pretty cool actually.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Like it's I thought it was gonna be like a lot different than what it is. Um, and like I'm a little confused by it as well. Like it's very interesting and the characters are very like, their development is slow, but it isn't at the same time they action is slow, but like learning the characters is not, so it feels slow. It's very good though. I , I really like it. It's very interesting. Um , and the music is, is kind of fun cuz it's kind of weird. <laugh> um , it's like not a traditional like, you know, TV show I guess. Okay . Um , so that's very good. Uh I'm you should check out . Yeah. You should like, even I would say it's just go in mind. Like when you , if you start it just like it's gonna be a little slow and that's okay. You know, like that's just something you have to have in mind for it.

Speaker 1:

I can get down with that. I've been, I have been religiously binging downtown Abbey . Oh, okay. I am almost done with it and I love a period piece. It's just a matter of time before, before <laugh> there's a , I wanna do, I wanna do more than one. I wanna do like all throughout my career. I wanna do period pieces .

Speaker 2:

Amazing. I

Speaker 1:

Can't wait . I mean, I feel like I've just kind of been like biting my time until it happens because I know that that's a place where it , I just know that it's in my wheelhouse. Oh yeah . But like I could totally

Speaker 2:

See that it's like magical and like still a period piece

Speaker 1:

Heightened, you know, a lot of it is about the acting and about like performance and character and, you know, gives you the opportunity to just do some brilliant cinematography with storytelling mm-hmm <affirmative> and you know, really gets to focus on and , and also fashion is like very, very important to your girl . So <laugh> um, you know, you know that , um, yes . So when I beautiful clothes and beautiful acting and beautiful. Yeah . So what's not then Downton Abby , I'm late to the game. I realize that, but it, which I usually am. I like elect to be late to the game always in per yeah . But um, yeah, it's just become my guilty pleasure and

Speaker 2:

I've also , um, I decided, cuz I kind of like , uh , did not, I'm not like really caught up with all the Marvel movies and all of that. So I started rewatching some of them or like all of them I'm in the process of watching it, but in timeline order. So that's been very fun. Yeah . That's been very fun.

Speaker 1:

What I would love to work on a Marvel movie. I mean I've always, oh my God. Me too. Yeah. I've always said that. Like that's my, one of my dream. I wanna direct big superhero movies.

Speaker 2:

Yes. Cuz how fun would that be? Yeah. Yeah . And like if that's one of my things where I'm like, I really wanna work on like a super cool video game and then yes, I wanna work on a Marvel movie or like a superhero movie, like anything, anything with like aliens and like cool sound design and like space guns, you know, come down .

Speaker 1:

Okay . You're talking to the right person. <laugh> um, yeah, no, absolutely. Yeah. One of the things I wanted to chat with you today was about like, what are your dreams? So video games. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Uh, like sound designing or implementing sound in video games and uh, yeah. Working on like animation or, you know, cartoon style thing is , is something that like, I think is very fun and like wanna do more of cuz a lot of the stuff we do is, is like, you know, short films that are shot like in real life. They're not like animated or anything. So anything with that, like aspect would be very fun to like get my hands on. Well, where can

Speaker 1:

We follow you? How can we keep up with what you're working on next?

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So , um, my Instagram is Vic three underscores cuz the other ones were taken , uh , T so Vic underscore, underscore underscore T and then , uh , you can see what I'm working on, on my Instagram or on , uh , noise, floors, Instagram or Facebook. So it's just , uh , at noise floor on LTD.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Also check out their website for , for more details on what noise floor who noise floor is and what they do and who is on their team. You know, I was scoping out Victoria on IMDB earlier. So go, go per Perr. She's very, very impressive young woman in the industry doing great things and sound. This episode of the walkie check is sponsored by camera ambassador, a one stop shop, carrying everything from cameras and lenses to grip trucks and production supplies. Their equipment roster includes high end brands, such as air red cannon cook Zeis O'Connor small HD Tara deck and more . They've also got you covered from specialty items such as amorphic lenses gimbals and grip trucks founded in 2014 by Erica Duffy camera ambassadors, one of three equipment rental houses nationwide owned and operated by a woman per providing excellent service with quality gear camera ambassador now carries both of the newest red cameras, the Komoto and Raptor. Learn more about camera ambassadors, scholarship opportunities@cameraambassador.com. Thanks so much for joining us on this episode of the walkie check. Be sure to give us a like and follow on Instagram and Facebook at the walkie check and at legacy Marie pictures also special, special thanks to our executive producers, noise floor LT D and we look forward to the next episode .